Department of Art and Art History Art Education

Art educators Pam G. Taylor and Christine Ballengee-Morris visit UT Austin to discuss how to make an impact through arts learning

Thu. March 2, 2017

Part call to action, part heart-to-heart and part brass-tacks lesson-planning, the seminar and lecture by art educators and close colleagues Dr. Pam G. Taylor and Dr. Christine Ballengee-Morris at the UT Austin Department of Art and Art History delivered on the promise of sharing how to make a difference as visual arts educators.

two students crafting hybrid stuffed animals look to the right


During the seminar with upper level undergraduate Visual Art Studies students Taylor and Ballengee-Morris came ready to work—or to put the students to work. Believers in kinetic learning, the visiting scholars had students create “Franken-Pets” by assembling new, hybrid creatures from the parts of other stuffed animals they brought into the classroom. As students created their creatures, Taylor and Ballengee-Morris unpacked the art historical, cultural sensitivity and curriculum goals that could be interwoven into the lesson. 

“It’s not always recognized, but we have power in the art world,” said Taylor during the seminar as she made the case for teaching students how to become critical thinkers who can deconstruct our increasingly visually-oriented world. Later in the day, Taylor and Ballengee-Morris’ lecture would stress the same, while also unfolding a long history of friendship and academic collaboration that has sustained their practice as educators. Taylor is Professor of Art Education in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA and her research interests include data visualization, hypermediation theory, and curriculum and assessment in art education. Ballengee-Morris is a professor in the Arts Administration, Education, and Policy Department and the American Indian Studies Coordinator for The Ohio State University, and the founding director of The Multicultural Center at OSU. Ballengee-Morris’ research interests include self-determination, identity development, Indigenous arts, and service-learning. Having known each other for 23 years, Taylor and Ballengee-Morris emphasized how their unique professional and personal experiences as researchers have influenced their collaborative endeavors.

student in profile with burnt orange shirt sews stuffed animal together

The two researchers encouraged students to develop their own networks to achieve the kind of change they want to see in the world. “We hope to create change agents that will spread these ideas in the community,” echoed both Taylor and Ballengee-Morris when talking about the goals of inclusivity, multiculturalism and interdisciplinary learning that are organic outcomes of a pedagogy based upon listening, challenging and changing together.  

Visual Art Studies Students Awarded Travel Grants to Attend National Conference

Wed. January 18, 2017

The College of Fine Arts (CoFA) and Fine Arts Career Services (FACS) have awarded eight Visual Arts Studies students with Professional Travel Grants to attend the National Art Education Association’s (NAEA) conference in March. CoFA provides these grants for travel to professional development opportunities and all enrolled undergraduates are encouraged to apply.

The 2017 recipients from Visual Arts Studies are:
• Anamarie Delgado
• Paulina Dosal-Terminal
• Anyssa Flores
• Chelsea Freestone
• Tanya Gantiva
• Elysium Gonzalez
• Hannah Luse
• Michelle Zhou

Six students—Luse, Freestone, Zhou, Gonzalez, Delgado and Flores—will be co-presenting "Game Changer: Playing with Possibilities in Preservice Preparation" with Dr. Joana Hyatt of Lamar University and Dr. Christina Bain of The University of Texas at Austin. A highly competitive conference within the field of art education, NAEA conference has an acceptance rate of 35% for presentation submissions, making UT Austin students’ achievement at the NAEA conference. Their presentation will focus on a game that the Visual Arts Studies preservice students helped to create, based on real-life teaching scenarios.
 

Students and Faculty Attend Texas Art Education Association's Annual Conference

Fri. December 2, 2016

students and teacher
(Left to right) Julia Caswell, Chelsea Freestone, Hannah Reed, Madison Weakley, Dr. Christina Bain, Katie Gregory, (below) Courtney Jones.

This past month, Visual Art Studies students attended the Texas Art Education Association’s annual conference in Dallas. The conference seeks to promote quality visual arts education as an integral part of learning in Texas through the professional development and advancement of knowledge and skills, representation of the art educators of Texas, service and leadership opportunities, and research and development of policies and decisions relative to practices and directions in visual arts education.

two students
(Left to right) Madison Weakley, Hannah Reed

Awards for excellence in the field were given to UT Austin faculty members Paul Bolin for TAEA Distinguished Fellow and Heidi Powell for TAEA Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award. In addition, faculty, current and former Visual Art Studies students presented research and best practices in a variety of conference presentations. Included among the presentations were current senior Julia Caswell’s “The Walking Classroom: Audio Walks and Engagement," which explored how interactive audio walks may be implemented in the art classroom, and alumnus Shaun Lane and Shelby Johnson's “Myth vs. Reality: Student Teaching,” an investigation of students’ relationships with student teachers vs. in-service teachers. Faculty members Christina Bain and Heidi Powell presented a workshop titled "Animating Your Curriculum" that taught how to integrate time-lapse software into an art education curriculum. 

Christina Bain also presented a two hour workshop, "Penelope Paper Strip, Puppets, and Paper Sculpture," with VAS students Courtney Jones, Hannah Reed, Madison Weakley, Katie Gregory, Chelsea Freestone and Julia Caswell that explored how storytelling can set the stage for teaching basic paper sculpture techniques. This conference presentation was a natural extension of previous research presented at the International Society for Education through Art annual conference. Research from contemporary art educators at The University of Texas at Austin innovates upon current practices, incorporating elements of gamification and technology. "I think technology has always been a focus of art instruction," said Bain. "As technologies of the times change, so too does instruction. Technologies spotlighted in conferences such as TAEA dovetail with the general push in education to focus on 21st century learning skills."  

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