Department of Art and Art History Art Education

Students and Faculty Attend Texas Art Education Association's Annual Conference

Fri. December 2, 2016

students and teacher
(Left to right) Julia Caswell, Chelsea Freestone, Hannah Reed, Madison Weakley, Dr. Christina Bain, Katie Gregory, (below) Courtney Jones.

This past month, Visual Art Studies students attended the Texas Art Education Association’s annual conference in Dallas. The conference seeks to promote quality visual arts education as an integral part of learning in Texas through the professional development and advancement of knowledge and skills, representation of the art educators of Texas, service and leadership opportunities, and research and development of policies and decisions relative to practices and directions in visual arts education.

two students
(Left to right) Madison Weakley, Hannah Reed

Awards for excellence in the field were given to UT Austin faculty members Paul Bolin for TAEA Distinguished Fellow and Heidi Powell for TAEA Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award. In addition, faculty, current and former Visual Art Studies students presented research and best practices in a variety of conference presentations. Included among the presentations were current senior Julia Caswell’s “The Walking Classroom: Audio Walks and Engagement," which explored how interactive audio walks may be implemented in the art classroom, and alumnus Shaun Lane and Shelby Johnson's “Myth vs. Reality: Student Teaching,” an investigation of students’ relationships with student teachers vs. in-service teachers. Faculty members Christina Bain and Heidi Powell presented a workshop titled "Animating Your Curriculum" that taught how to integrate time-lapse software into an art education curriculum. 

Christina Bain also presented a two hour workshop, "Penelope Paper Strip, Puppets, and Paper Sculpture," with VAS students Courtney Jones, Hannah Reed, Madison Weakley, Katie Gregory, Chelsea Freestone and Julia Caswell that explored how storytelling can set the stage for teaching basic paper sculpture techniques. This conference presentation was a natural extension of previous research presented at the International Society for Education through Art annual conference. Research from contemporary art educators at The University of Texas at Austin innovates upon current practices, incorporating elements of gamification and technology. "I think technology has always been a focus of art instruction," said Bain. "As technologies of the times change, so too does instruction. Technologies spotlighted in conferences such as TAEA dovetail with the general push in education to focus on 21st century learning skills."  

Christina Bain and Colleagues Pave New Path with Technology-based Instruction Utilizing Animation and Gamification of Learning

Mon. November 21, 2016


Dr. Christina Bain

Professor of Visual Art Studies and Art Education Christina Bain presented "Vulnerability and Vicissitudes: The Role of Scenario-Based Games in Preservice Preparation" at the International Society for Education through the Arts (INSEA) in Vienna, Austria last month.

“Experienced educators recognize that teaching is a complex, social process that is influenced by many contextual factors,” writes Bain. “The best solution to a situation—in theory—might be effective in one place but not in another. Therefore, preservice students often feel unprepared because they have limited teaching experience to draw upon. So, through my research I ask: How might preservice students learn from the wisdom and experience of seasoned teachers?” The solution, posed within Bain’s conference presentation, is K-16 collaborations. The Worst Case Scenario Art Game is one such strategy that improves preservice preparation by basing playing cards on authentic scenarios experienced by preservice and in-service teachers.

Likewise, Dr. Christina Bain, Dr. Heidi Powell and Dr. Bill Nieberding presented "Animating Your Curriculum" at the Texas Art Education Association conference in Dallas, Texas on November 18, 2016. This presentation explored how animation software was integrated into three university art education courses. On November 19, Bain presented at TAEA with Courtney Jones, Hannah Reed, Madison Weakley, Katie Gregory, Chelsea Freestone and Julia Caswell (undergraduates in Visual Art Studies, 2017) in a two-hour workshop titled "Penelope Paper Strip, Puppets, and Paper Sculpture," which explores how storytelling can set the stage for teaching basic paper sculpture techniques.
 

Professors in Art Education Publish New Book, Are Honored by Texas Art Education Association

Wed. October 12, 2016

Dr. Paul Bolin
Dr. Paul Bolin, editor of Revitalizing History and 2016 TAEA Distinguished Fellow

The last academic conference on the history of art education was held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1995. In 2015, recognizing a dearth of scholarship in historical research among visual arts educators, assistant chair of The University of Texas at Austin’s Art Education Program Dr. Paul Bolin and his colleagues Dr. Ami Kantawala (Teachers College, Columbia University) and Dr. Mary Ann Stankiewicz (The Pennsylvania State University) organized the first conference on the history of art education held in the last two decades. Research submitted to the conference, “Brushes with History: Imagination and Innovation in Art Education History,” would later give rise to the forthcoming publication, Revitalizing History: Recognizing the Struggles, Lives, and Achievements of African American and Women Art Educators.



 

Edited by Bolin and Kantawala, Revitalizing History recognizes the historical role that many overlooked individuals—particularly African Americans and women—have played in the field of art education, and acknowledges the importance of history and historical research in this digital age. “The history of art education, similar to the traditional canon of art history, has been dominated by white men like Walter Smith,” remarked Bolin. “My colleagues and I felt that an introduction, or a re-visitation to the contributions of other art educators on the periphery of our historical view would challenge our field with new and more complex stories that are yet in the making, and provide a platform to sustain a vibrant culture of groundbreaking scholarship in art education. The papers submitted from faculty and researchers across the US has proven this point.”

Historical inquiry forms the foundation for much research undertaken in art education. While traversing paths of historical investigation in this field visual art educators may discover undocumented moments and overlooked or hidden individuals, as well as encounter challenging ideas in need of exploration and critique. In doing so, history is approached from multiple and, at times, vitally diverse perspectives. Revitalizing History hopes to generate conversations through publication that will encourage more interest in histories of art education, but also more sophisticated and innovative approaches to historical research in this field. Contributors to the publication include Art Education assistant chair Dr. Christina Bain and lecturer Dr. Heidi Powell, in addition to five former graduate students of the Department of Art and Art History’s Art Education Program.

Heidi Powell
Dr. Heidi Powell, contributor to Revitalizing History and recipient of Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award

Bolin’s commitment to pioneering scholarship in the history of art education, advancement of the field, and his long-term contributions to the work of the Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) have earned him the distinct honor of being inducted as a TAEA Distinguished Fellow at the association’s fall conference this November. Additionally, Dr. Heidi Powell will be awarded the TAEA Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award that goes to the nominated individual who has significantly contributed to the field of art education on the state, local and national levels.

 


 

Visual Art Studies students intern across the world, from San Marcos and Austin to New York and Italy

Mon. September 5, 2016

 

Work from students at Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos
Work from students at Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos

Junior Tanya Gantiva and Senior Paulina Dosal-Terminel, Visual Art Students undergraduates, worked at the Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos. Gantiva and Dosal-Terminel interned as art directors for the institute’s free summer camp for youth. As a part of the Indigenous Cultures Institute’s mission to research and preserve indigenous culture, the summer camp offers youth a chance to learn about indigenous arts and their indigenous identities through hands-on workshops and projects.

“The whole process was such an incredible learning experience for me as an educator, artist and human being,” Paulina Dosal-Terminel writes. “Teaching art using indigenous methods, as well as working with a group of extremely talented individuals to guide students' on a path of learning that is both encouraging of individuality and conscious of the collective home we all share, really opened my eyes to how art is present in every moment of our lives.”


Madi Beavers (Visual Art Studies, 2018) interned at The Contemporary in Austin, working with the museum’s teen program. Over the course of the summer, Beavers learned the ins and outs of writing teacher materials and designing educational initiatives tailored toward a teen demographic. Ultimately, Beavers and her team of high school students created inventive zines as a product of their experiments, discussion and experience.


Julia Caswell at CMA
Julia Caswell at CMA

Julia Caswell (Visual Art Studies, 2017) had a fantastic summer internship as a School Programs Intern for The Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York (CMA). Working in collaboration with other nonprofits and arts organizations in New York, Caswell facilitated art-making inspired by interdisciplinary themes of CMA exhibits. Her work on a public art mural project is highlighted on the Children’s Museum of Art’s website.

 


Lastly, Visual Art Studies students traveled to Italy with Art History professor Dr. Ann Johns and made a brave journey to see Christo’s Floating Piers.

Through these internships, Visual Art Studies students are given the opportunity to practice pedagogy in the field, exploring the connections between trends in visual arts and contemporary art education.
 

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