Department of Art and Art History Faculty

Bogdan P.K. Perzyński featured in latest exhibition of Texas A&M Commerce VisCom Gallery

Wed. April 12, 2017


Bogdan P. K. Perzyński 5°26′3.439″N,12°21′18.780″E; 45°26′1.295″N,12°21′19.357″E
2015
Performance and 4K video (silent, 14:14 m:s)


Transmedia professor Bogdan P. K. Perzyński is featured in the latest group show at the VisCom Gallery, The Architecture of Limitless Delusionan exhibition curated by Liliana Bloch and Thomas Flynn II in downtown Dallas. The show highlights the use of forced perspective, metaphysics and that special sort of alchemy required to create works of art that are somehow bigger than the objects that sustain them.

From the press release materials, “Architecture tends to promote itself, creating self-referential components that together can create imposing structures. In the same way, the artists featured in the exhibition elevate themselves and the art objects using simple shapes, the basics of geometry and architecture. They are creating objects that become bigger than what they are. We chose these objects that display the dexterity of the artist to use geometric forms that build upon the meeting of conscious choices with conceptual implications.

As the objects build upon themselves and each other to create a self-contained environment of possibilities, the artists featured in the show are the architects of limitless delusion in an empty city waiting to be populated. The latter references the psychology of the self, and perhaps a little bit of mysticism.”

Other artists in The Architecture of Limitless Delusion include Du Chau, Kristen Cochran, Anne Glazer, Ryan Goolsby, Lynne Harlow, Vince Jones, Alicia Henry, Kathy Lovas, Shawn Mayer, Leigh Merrill, Mi-Hee Nahm, Bogdan P. K. Perzyński, Bret Slater, Simon Vega and Sally Warren.

The exhibition will be on view from April 6 – May 5, 2017.

Professor John Clarke and Oplontis Project Win Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellowship

Mon. March 27, 2017

AAH logo with Texas in orange above text reading Art and Art History
 

The Loeb Classical Library Foundation at Harvard University has awarded a Loeb Classical Library Fellowship to Art History Professor John Clarke and the Oplontis Project. The Loeb Classical Library Foundation awards fellowships to qualified scholars to support research, publication and other projects in the area of classical studies. With the fellowship in 2017-2018, Oplontis Project will continue their work at the site of Oplontis in Torre Annunziata, Italy.


 

Jason Urban's The Formalist's Library exhibition opens at SNAP Gallery

Thu. March 23, 2017

open book with concentric black rectangles

From the 1940's zines devoted to H.P. Lovecraft to the Soviet underground press samizat, the recent work of Studio Art faculty member Jason Urban mines the rich landscape of print history. His prints, drawings, paintings and installations have been featured in numerous venues nationally and internationally, and, most recently, brought him to The University of Alberta. Urban was invited to lecture about his work and research in conjunction with the opening of The Formalist’s Library at The Society of Northern Alberta Print-artists (SNAP) Gallery in Edmonton, Alberta.

In The Formalist’s Library, Urban meditates on the structure of the traditional brick-and-mortar library as a vehicle for delivering information as we move from the physical to physible. The Formalist’s Library is an ongoing series exploring various aspects of library architecture and systems and the lifespan of printed media in both the micro (daily) and macro (centurial) sense.

The Formalist's Library is on view March 16, 2017 - April 22, 2017.

Hotel Mexico awarded the Arvey Foundation Book Award from the Association for Latin American Art

Mon. March 20, 2017

depiction of book cover with blue tinted skyline of mexico and title of book
Hotel Mexico: Dwelling on the '68 Movement by George Flaherty


Each year the Association for Latin American Art (ALAA) selects a book representing the best scholarly work published on the art of Latin America from the Pre-Columbian era to the present for the Arvey Foundation Book Award. This year, the selection committee honored Art History assistant professor George Flaherty with that award for his most recent book, Hotel Mexico: Dwelling on the '68 Movement (University of California Press, 2016).

“In his abundantly detailed, thoughtful, and theoretically sophisticated study, Flaherty engages a pivotal episode, the 1968 massacre of 300 student protestors in Mexico City ten days before the Olympics,” said Charlene Villaseñor Black, ALAA Chair, during the award presentation. “Flaherty considers Mexico in 1968 and its cinematic, photographic, and literary afterimages in an analysis of the diverse ways in which the Tlatelolco Massacre is remembered, evoked, and memorialized.”

Flaherty publishes primarily on Latin American and U.S. Latino visual and spatial cultures since 1940, with emphasis on Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. His research and teaching interests extend to Cuba, film and media studies, postcolonial and subaltern studies, and the historiography of global contemporary art. Hotel Mexico investigates the spatial dimensions of the 1968 student-led protest movement in Mexico City and its representation. 

Professor Joan Holladay Invited to Lecture at Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures in Hamburg

Mon. March 20, 2017

woman in black blazer standing to the right of her power point presentation
Dr. Joan Holladay


The Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures engages in fundamental research on the diversity of manuscript cultures. In early March, the center invited Art History Professor Joan Holladay along with scholars of manuscripts from across the globe to share their research in Hamburg, Germany during a workshop titled, “The Illustration of History in Medieval Manuscripts.”

Meant to address the question of the illustration of historical texts in both Western European and Persian traditions, the colloquia in March brought together specialists from Europe, the United States and Turkey, to provide a comparative approach to many common questions in the field. Holladay’s presentation focused on her research in western medieval art, specifically focusing on cases where manuscript illustrations depart from patterning manusc imagery after its accompanying text and choose to depict family trees.

“My paper examined three different kinds of chronicles whose illustrations depart from this expected pattern in which the images illustrate events narrated in the text,” writes Holladay. “All three replace such narrative imagery with family trees, diagrams that are not generated by the text. If the choice of narrative episodes to illustrate the events in more typically illuminated chronicles reveal an understanding of the text, I ask: ‘How do such family trees elaborate, supplement, or gloss the text?’”
 

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