Department of Art and Art History Undergraduate Students

Senior Art Major Gabrielle Maritza Daubourg Completes Inaugural New York Residency

Mon. November 21, 2016


Film stills from footage take during Anti-Trump protest outside Trump Tower

Operated out of DUMBO Brooklyn, by the Association of Independent Colleges of Art & Design (AICAD), the New York Studio Residency Program (NYSRP) offers a semester-long program for selected art students across the United States. Given their own studio space and the opportunity for intensive engagement with artists and colleagues, participating students are given an exceptional introduction to the New York art world.

This year, senior Studio Art undergraduate Gabrielle Daubourg joined twelve other students from across the U.S. and Canada in New York to embark on the residency. A change of scenery is nothing new for Daubourg. Originally from France, born and raised in Paris, she moved to Texas when she was sixteen years old. At The University of Texas at Austin, she studied philosophy before transferring to Studio Art in order to work in film. When describing the program, Daubourg writes, “The academic structure of the program is very laissez-faire and allows each students to have time to explore the city, go to museums, exhibits and work in our studios. No micro managing.” The critical seminars that take place from Monday through Thursday involve discussion of assigned texts to current events. “These discussions have been highly influential,” writes Daubourg. “especially as a practicing video maker, in this cultural climate, which is purely mediated through consumption and image-based relationships.”

man in film still
Film stills from footage take during Anti-Trump protest outside Trump Tower

Writing with Daubourg over email during mid-terms, we learned that Magdalena Sawon of Postmasters Gallery came to the studios as a guest critic. Sawon is known for cultivating talent in new and emerging artists working in sculpture and painting to new media. Among twelve students, she is the only one that works in video; most others work in sculpture, painting, screen printing and other mediums. All of the object-making makes for a dynamic exchange of voices and critical approaches, especially during midterm critiques. “As I primarily work in video, my shooting occurred after the midterm, so the majority of what I had to show was comprised of writings,” writes Daubourg. “I presented some previous works in order to show the visual strategies I intended on applying to the upcoming project. Otherwise it was a surprisingly polite and safe critique, especially considering the student’s overall sense of anxiety prior to the event, which only served to disappoint my masochistic tendencies.”

The individual studio spaces given to each student artist are a boon to their production and a unique opportunity to expand upon projects over the course of the semester. When discussing her studio space as a video artist, Daubourg responded, “My studio space looks more like an office. It’s clean, orderly and meticulous; a failed, conscious mise-en-scène to attempt to calm my neurosis.” Remarking on the comparison to other students’ studios, “The space lacks the liveliness and colors of the painter’s studios and as another student put it, ‘it’s sad, sterile and lacks warmth.’ The next day I bought a candle.”

Assuming that Daubourg employed the same crackling wit in her work, we asked her what some of her current projects entailed. “At the moment the process of aging and the attempt to preserve histories through different aspects of storytelling is central to my relationships with current subjects,” writes Daubourg. “My work is dependent on subjects, either actors, dancers or family members. I only occupy the studio for research or editing.” The constraints she puts on herself in terms of subject matter and approach means that she spends most days outside, establishing relationships with individuals she is curious about before retiring to her studio to edit. As a means of establishing authentic relationships, Daubourg is volunteering with an organization that establishes physical and emotional support for seniors in the city. “I have started developing a closeness with certain individuals and started a process of documenting them in their space and recording our conversations.”

“Most of my current work happens prior to capturing any footage. Because of my dependency on people I spend a lot of time building the relationship before I can introduce the invasive presence of a camera into their personal space. Trust must be established, a construction that is undeniably dependent on time.”

part of woman's face in film still frame
Film stills from footage take during Anti-Trump protest outside Trump Tower

With a month left in the semester, Daubourg reflects back on some of the most enriching parts of the residency, “just the ability to produce work in one of the greatest cities in the world is such a tremendous opportunity. There is a freedom to experiment and attention given to young artists that I want to see everywhere and bring back with me.”  

Ryan Lauderdale presents work in group exhibition at Carroll/Fletcher

Mon. April 25, 2016

sculpture of metal and florescent light in gallery room
flora extrusion/funerary, 2016, rormica, wood, fluorescent light, glass, standoffs, extruded aluminum, hardware, vertical power strip, candle, long-stem rose, 70 x 4 8 x 36 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ryan Lauderdale (B.F.A in Studio Art, B.A. in Art History, 2005) presents work in Dense Mesh, a group exhibition at Carroll/Fletcher in London. The exhibition will be on view April 14 – May 25, 2016.

Xochi Solis presents work in three person exhibition at MASS Gallery

Sat. June 4, 2016

collage of pink, gray, and yellow circular shapes
Image courtesy of the artist and Pele Prints.

Xochi Solis (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 2005) presents work in a three-person exhibition, Extended Technique, at MASS Gallery. The exhibition will be on view April 29 – June 4, 2016.

The Alcalde features Young Bloods exhibition by Center Space Project

Mon. April 25, 2016

group of people smiling in front of wall in gallery
Photo by Jessilee Shipman

The Alcalde, the official publication of the Texas Exes, featured Young Bloods, an exhibition by Center Space Project.

Tyler Tschirhart receives Center for the Study of Ancient Italy Summer Fieldwork Fellowship

Fri. April 29, 2016

man in suit stands in front of greenery and smiles

The Center for the Study of Ancient Italy (CSAI) is pleased to announce Tyler Tschirhart as the recipient of the 2016 CSAI Summer FIeldwork Fellowship. An art history and biochemistry double major, Tyler is a junior who is working on an honors thesis that focuses on renovations of the Horologium Augusti by the Emperors Domitian and Hadrian.

The CSAI fellowship will pay for Tschirhart to travel to Italy and participate in the Oplontis Project May 22 – June 17, 2016. This CSAI excavation project studies two ancient Roman sites at Oplontis, a seaside town destroyed by the same eruption that covered Pompeii. In addition to getting the chance to excavate at Oplontis Villa B, he will work on research projects with the project's directors, Professor John Clarke and Dr. Michael Thomas. This research will include the opportunity to study and catalog wall painting fragments with Professor Clarke and document architectural masonry with Dr. Thomas. This trip will be Tschirhart's first to Italy.

"Last year, I found my calling in art history and quickly fell in love with the the way in which politics shaped the city of Imperial Rome," says Tschirhart.

Tschirhart hopes to go to graduate school in order to earn his Ph.D. in Roman art and architecture. He is also interested in antiquities law and the antiquities market. His hobbies include keeping up with world news and politics, watching movies and television shows, and collecting trivial knowledge.

Syndicate content