Department of Art and Art History News

Dance with flARmingos: Kristin Lucas interviewed by Oregon Public Broadcasting on the latest evolution in her work with virtual reality

Mon. February 27, 2017

“As a December snowstorm raged around OSB’s office in downtown Portland, the artist Kristin Lucas was dreaming of flamingos.”

And so begins the podcast episode “Oregon Virtual Reality Incubator Takes Artists Into New Worlds” from Oregon’s NPR station. The host, Aaron Scott featured the artists and work from an Augmented/Virtual Reality Artist Residency, including Transmedia professor Kristin Lucas.

screen shot of a virtual reality flamingo dance and in the left corner a person
film still from Dance with the flARmingos: Multispecies Dance

Kristin Lucas' virtual reality project, Dance with flARmingos: Multispecies Dance is a poetic proposition that re-imagines kinship between humans and flamingos from the ethical distance of a Mixed Reality experience. However, Dance with flARmingos, has been a long time in the making and functions as the umbrella title for a series of Augmented Reality projects Lucas has produced since 2015. The latest iteration of the project, Multispecies Dance, takes the series in a new direction, utilizing new Augmented and Virtual Reality technologies, including the Microsoft HoloLens and HTC Vive. Lucas' project is inspired by writings on ecology and feminism, and involves partnership with a wetlands reserve organization in the Mediterranean where she recently adopted flamingos as a part of a conservation effort. Production support for Multispecies Dance is being provided through residencies affiliated with Oregon Story Board/Upfor Gallery (Portland), Harvestworks (New York) and Printscreen Festival (Tel Aviv).

To listen to the podcast, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting’s website.
 

Michael Smith traces origins of Baby Ikki persona in screening and panel conversation at Museum Brandhorst

Mon. February 27, 2017

A man facing the horizon dressed in diaper stares at desert sun
 
Transmedia professor Michael Smith will be speaking on a panel with art historian Helmut Draxler and artists Peter Wächtler and Jutta Zimmermann at the end of March. Panel discussion will focus on panelist engagement with post-apocalyptic narratives in their work.

The March 31 panel and screenings are among a series hosted by Museum Brandhorst titled “Post-Apocalyptic Realism: It’s After the End of the World. Don’t You Know That?”, which brings together artists who, “[take] the fragile status of mankind in the world as their starting point,” as the museum’s press relates. “Post-apocalyptic stories are also a continuation of one of modernity’s essential narratives: the narrative of the self which has lost its ground and place in a world that has long been out of joint. They are directed at a possible future while at the same time being profoundly anchored in the given reality of the present and past.”

In a description of Smith’s work and contribution to discussion, Museum Brandhorst’s program details,

“For over thirty years, video/performance/installation artist Michael Smith has built an extensive body of work based on two performance personae: Mike, a hopeful innocent who continually falls victim to trends and fashions outside his reach; and Baby Ikki, an ambiguously aged toddler who follows his impulses down unsupervised and often precipitous paths. Both characters are convenient narrative vehicles for Smith to engage the tragicomic aspects of contemporary culture, teasing out facets of loneliness, consumerism, and measures of success and failure. Following the screening of Baby Ikki’s trip to the Burning Man Festival (“A Voyage of Growth and Discovery”, Michael Smith and Mike Kelley, 2010, 87min), Smith will trace the origins of each persona back to the mid-1970s, discussing how feminism, the silent majority, blandness and the media informed their separate and arrested development.”

More details about the series and Michael Smith can be found at e-flux and Museum Brandhorst.  

Studio Art Professor Troy Brauntuch among 1980s artists highlighted in T Magazine feature on Pictures Generation

Fri. February 24, 2017

dark red drawing of figures close to floorboards
Troy Brauntuch, “Floor Boards,” 1984, pastel and conte on cotton, 108 in. x 144 in., courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York
 
Troy Brauntuch was featured in New York Times' T magazine for contribution to the Pictures Generation, artists of the 1980s heralded by the publication for their continued significance.
 


 

David Stuart interviewed on KERA Think podcast about Ancient Maya

Tue. February 21, 2017

Maya steps seen from a side angle
Shutterstock

Professor of Art History and Co-Director of the Mesoamerica Center David Stuart joined Think host Krys Boyd to talk about the people who once dominated parts of Mexico and Central America – the subject of the exhibit “Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed” at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.

To listen to the full podcast, click here
For more coverage on Stuart and the Perot Museum visit NBCDFW.com.

Alumnus Tom Holmes Debuts Third Solo Show at Bureau Gallery

Wed. February 15, 2017

scaled up and flattened Eggo waffle box with automatic drawing overlaid on top
Tom Holmes, untitled Arrangement, 2014-2017, 93.75 x 174.5 inches

Tom Holmes (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 1999) debuts new work in L’Eggo My Eggo® at Bureau Gallery in New York. 

Holmes’s new paintings feature a vastly scaled-up and flattened waffle box announcing an explosive fantasy of infantile breakfast joy. The box’s graphic finish serves as ground for a flurry of abstract marks of expanded automatic drawing. Over the past two and a half years, working with a hypnotist, Holmes has sought to excavate the expressive potential of the subconscious mind through automatism, connecting a deep anxiety and fear of the inevitable with the pure communicative potential of the hand. The movement of the pen vigorously and subtly transcribes the non-verbal. In one composition comic heroines surf the sprawling lines and colorful passages ushering routes between mind and body; pop and expressionism.