Department of Art and Art History Art History

Khristaan Villela Appointed Director of Santa Fe Museum

Wed. October 12, 2016

Khristaan D. Villela
 
Khristaan D. Villela (M.A. in Art History, 1993; PhD in Art History, 2001) has been appointed Director of the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M. Villela came to the museum from the Santa Fe University of Art and Design (SFUAD), where he was Professor of Art History and Scholar in Residence. 
 
Villela has curated exhibitions at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the Miho Museum in Kyoto, Japan, and the New Mexico History Museum. Most recently, he was consulting curator for Miguel Covarrubias: Drawing a Cosmopolitan Line at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe.  Prior to his appointment at SFUAD, Villela was Eugene V. Thaw Professor of Art History at the College of Santa Fe and was the founding director of the Thaw Art History Center. He writes frequently for publications including New Mexico Magazine, El Palacio, ARTNews, Adobe Airstream, and he has a column in the Santa Fe New Mexican Pasatiempo section. He is the author of Ancient Civilizations of the Americas: Man, Nature, and Spirit in Pre-Columbian Art (Miho Museum, 2011); The Aztec Calendar Stone (with Mary Miller, Getty Publications, 2010); and Contemporary Mexican Architecture and Design (with Ellen Bradbury Reid and Logan Wagner, Gibbs Smith Publications, 2002). He is working on a book on the contributions of the Mexican artist, collector and curator Miguel Covarrubias to Pre-Columbian studies in US and Mexico in the mid-twentieth century. Another book project is the first publication of an album of 1860s photographs, the Souvenir of New Mexico, assembled by a US Army officer in New Mexico Territory. The album includes what may be the first photos of the Navajo, as well as important images of the Navajo captivity at Fort Sumner, NM.

Inaugural Georgia O'Keeffe Museum Intern Thomas Edwards Spends Summer as Curatorial Fellow

Fri. September 9, 2016

With the generous help of the Tom and Charlene Marsh Family Foundation, Thomas Edwards (M.A. Art History, 2016) was the first University of Texas at Austin graduate selected to intern with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Over the course of the inaugural internship program, Edwards gained experienced as a curatorial fellow, working to organize the museum’s incredible research archives that serve as host to reviews and critical essays written about O’Keeffe, from 1916 to the present. “Under Curatorial Director Cody Hartley, who entrusted me with great autonomy while guiding me with meticulous care, I completed challenging projects that fostered in me a confidence and self-sufficiency with museum work that I will carry for the rest of my career,” Edwards writes.

clipping from O'Keeffe archive
 

Additionally, he updated this collection, honing in on articles written between 1916 and 1970 that enhanced and complicated the understanding of O’Keeffe’s critical reception. Edwards writes, “I gathered popular features written about O’Keeffe during her lifetime, obtained copies of the original publications, and began a long-term project to insert these magazines into the gallery space, offering visitors exciting contextual frameworks for O’Keeffe’s paintings and public image.”

As a separate endeavor, Edwards spent much of the summer developing the research and writing a proposal for a forthcoming exhibition narrating O’Keeffe’s excursions to Glen Canyon and the Colorado River in the 1960s, before and during its contested damming. This period, these trips and their associated stories, became especially relevant to Edwards’ work because O’Keeffe made some of her last paintings and charcoal drawings during this time.

“Opportunities like these, to work hands-on with collections and direct original research, are nearly unheard of in the category of internships and entry-level museum work,” Edwards remarked. “and as such the three months provided experience normally only available upon years of entry-level labor.”

To read more about his experience, visit the O’Keeffe museum blog.
 

Syndicate content