Department of Art and Art History Faculty

Julia Guernsey Published in Latin American Antiquity

Mon. October 3, 2016

Society for American Archaelegy journal

Art History Professor Dr. Julia Guernsey's paper, "Water, Maize, Salt, and Canoes: Iconography, Economics, and Commodities at Late Preclassic Izapa" was published in the October 2016 journal Latin American Antiquity from the Society for American Archaeology

In Memorium: Adam Boley

Thu. October 13, 2016

woman swimming in water

On Sunday, September 4, 2016, our community suffered the loss of a faculty member and alumnus, Adam Boley (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2016).

Boley graduated from our M.F.A. program in Studio Art the spring of 2016 and came to the Department of Art and Art History staff in the Fall semester as a lecturer in photography. During his time with the department, Boley assisted artist Ann Hamilton in the execution of her work for the Dell Medical Center, O N E E V E R Y O N E. “I have many very beautiful photographs of Adam from the photography sessions for Dell,” writes Hamilton. “I think they capture—something in him, a lightness and weight, reflectivity, a humor. I watched him work with everyone we photographed, how he put everyone at ease and made the air lighter with his empathy. I will never watch a duck land down in water without thinking of him.”

two ducks

Boley earned his undergraduate degree in Photography at St. Edwards University in Austin. His work has been in numerous exhibitions, including those at Time Waste Management in Orlando, Florida (2016); The Mom Gallery, Austin; 60 Orange St, Providence, Rhode Island (2015); Locker 95, Austin (2015); and Pump Project Art Complex in Austin (2014).

He was born and raised on a ranch outside of Georgetown, TX, and his work reflects a connection to the landscape and history of the state. “Texas was a central character in his work,” said Department of Art and Art History Chair Jack Risley. “He was able to channel the friction between its historic myth and its suburban present in work that captured both the serenity and violence of the rural landscape.”

Service for Boley took place in early September in Georgetown, TX.

Professors in Art Education Publish New Book, Are Honored by Texas Art Education Association

Wed. October 12, 2016

Dr. Paul Bolin
Dr. Paul Bolin, editor of Revitalizing History and 2016 TAEA Distinguished Fellow

The last academic conference on the history of art education was held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1995. In 2015, recognizing a dearth of scholarship in historical research among visual arts educators, assistant chair of The University of Texas at Austin’s Art Education Program Dr. Paul Bolin and his colleagues Dr. Ami Kantawala (Teachers College, Columbia University) and Dr. Mary Ann Stankiewicz (The Pennsylvania State University) organized the first conference on the history of art education held in the last two decades. Research submitted to the conference, “Brushes with History: Imagination and Innovation in Art Education History,” would later give rise to the forthcoming publication, Revitalizing History: Recognizing the Struggles, Lives, and Achievements of African American and Women Art Educators.


Edited by Bolin and Kantawala, Revitalizing History recognizes the historical role that many overlooked individuals—particularly African Americans and women—have played in the field of art education, and acknowledges the importance of history and historical research in this digital age. “The history of art education, similar to the traditional canon of art history, has been dominated by white men like Walter Smith,” remarked Bolin. “My colleagues and I felt that an introduction, or a re-visitation to the contributions of other art educators on the periphery of our historical view would challenge our field with new and more complex stories that are yet in the making, and provide a platform to sustain a vibrant culture of groundbreaking scholarship in art education. The papers submitted from faculty and researchers across the US has proven this point.”

Historical inquiry forms the foundation for much research undertaken in art education. While traversing paths of historical investigation in this field visual art educators may discover undocumented moments and overlooked or hidden individuals, as well as encounter challenging ideas in need of exploration and critique. In doing so, history is approached from multiple and, at times, vitally diverse perspectives. Revitalizing History hopes to generate conversations through publication that will encourage more interest in histories of art education, but also more sophisticated and innovative approaches to historical research in this field. Contributors to the publication include Art Education assistant chair Dr. Christina Bain and lecturer Dr. Heidi Powell, in addition to five former graduate students of the Department of Art and Art History’s Art Education Program.

Heidi Powell
Dr. Heidi Powell, contributor to Revitalizing History and recipient of Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award

Bolin’s commitment to pioneering scholarship in the history of art education, advancement of the field, and his long-term contributions to the work of the Texas Art Education Association (TAEA) have earned him the distinct honor of being inducted as a TAEA Distinguished Fellow at the association’s fall conference this November. Additionally, Dr. Heidi Powell will be awarded the TAEA Higher Education Division Outstanding Art Education Award that goes to the nominated individual who has significantly contributed to the field of art education on the state, local and national levels.



Teresa Hubbard Presents Work in Multiple Exhibitions This Fall

Wed. October 5, 2016

hands playing piano
still from House with Pool, Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler

Currently on sabbatical and completing a studio residency in Berlin awarded by the Aargauer Kuratorium, Photography Professor Teresa Hubbard will have her work with collaborator Alexander Birchler exhibited in multiple exhibitions this fall.

From October 6, 2016 – February 4, 2017, The State Museum for Art and Design Nuremberg, Germany will be exploring contemporary frontiers in film and video art. Hubbard and Birchler’s Single Wide will be shown in the month of December. Other artists included in the exhibition are Johan Grimonprez, Julian Rosefeldt, Stan Douglas and others. 

Also in October, the National Gallery in Prague’s Moving Image Department will commence its 6th Chapter: Inner Lives (Of Time), exhibiting the work of Hubbard and Birchler. The sixth chapter of the Moving Image Department concentrates on two parallel and complementary themes – the (inner) architecture of time and the architecture as a vehicle of a (real and imagined) temporality. The works gathered in “The Inner Lives (Of Time)” are reveries and as such, oscillating between the states of dreaming and waking, they express the psychology of both time and architecture, and their influence upon (mainly female) protagonists’ conscious and sub-conscious acts and the actions' flow. From the trance films of the American avant-garde filmmaker and film theorist of the 1940’s and 1950’s, Maya Deren through a cinematographic masterpiece, “House with Pool” (2004) by American-Swiss filmmakers Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler down to the structural poetry of Czech artist Markéta Othová’s photography and the poetic structure of Austrian artist Josef Dabernig’s already iconic Montage-System, the exhibition loops the stories in a search for a cinematic truth and magic. 

The exhibition will be on view October 5, 2016 – January 15, 2017

Beili Liu Featured in the 2016 Hangzhou Triennial of Fiber Art, Weaving & We

Mon. October 10, 2016

blue fiber art piece
In September 2016, Hangzhou–an ancient silk and global city–held the second Hangzhou Triennial of Fiber Art. Once again an international dialogue has been created between disciplines, geographies and people.  The Triennial stages this dialogue from a fiber art’s perspective both chronologically and on a grand scale.

In 2013, the first Hangzhou Triennial of Fiber Art attracted over 150 thousand visitors and artists from more than 16 countries. For the first time audiences in China had an opportunity to learn about modern fiber art. At the time of the Second Hangzhou Triennial the G20 Summit will take place. Running concurrently, these two international events will run in parallel.  Two global visions converge together with the creative vitality of the art works on display.
The second Triennial has a distinctive theme, “Weaving & We”, a starting point for curators and artists.
“Weaving” is a special practice. It is embedded in narrative. It tells stories that combine a history of textile labor and production with human experience. It tells these stories with raw materials and advanced technology. Technology changes at a fast pace and so too does the perception of weavers around the world, as individuals, groups and regions.
The exhibition has four sections which represent the research of curators. The artists selected echo Weaving & We from a numbers of different positions and perspectives.

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