Department of Art and Art History Faculty

Troy Brauntuch Exhibits Work in Solo Show at Petzel Gallery

Thu. November 17, 2016


Untitled (Statue)
2016
Pigment on cotton
100.75 x 55 inches

Troy Brauntuch, professor in painting and drawing, presents solo exhibition at Petzel Gallery in New York. The exhibition will be on view from November 3 - December 23, 2016.

In the introduction to a release from Petzel Gallery, Brauntuch's exhibition was described:

"An enormous painting of a nude welcomes the viewer: her arms are outstretched, her hands cropped, her torso slightly abstracted, her head tilts backward to the left into the dark blue background. Supposedly, she represents eternal beauty and perfection; however, the work is derived from a Heinrich Hoffmann photograph—a German propaganda image of a marble sculpture from the 1930s. A second picture in this gallery space closes in on an artist standing high atop a ladder, chiseling the head of a giant sculpture. Josef Thorak, Hitler’s most admired sculptor has been a source for various works by Brauntuch, who appropriated images of disinformation back in the 1970s when he was a member of the Pictures Generation, and sets the stage for this, Brauntuch’s sixth solo exhibition at Petzel."
 

Venice Biennale to Showcase work of UT Austin Professor Teresa Hubbard and Colleague Alexander Birchler

Mon. November 14, 2016


Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler
Flora, production still 
Courtesy the Artists and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, Vera Munro Gallery, Hamburg.
 

Teresa Hubbard, professor of photography at the Department of Art and Art History and Alexander Birchler, a Swiss artist who is an affiliate research scholar at UT Austin, have been invited to create and showcase new work at the 57th annual Venice Biennale, one of the largest and most prestigious exhibitions of contemporary art in the world.

“Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler have a deft ability to create visually compelling works that reorder cultural myths while implicating the conventions of photography and film,” said Jack Risley, chair of the department of art and art history at UT Austin. “Hubbard brings an exacting standard to her collaborative work with Birchler, a standard that also characterizes her teaching at UT where she has a profound effect on our studio art program.”

Curator Philipp Kaiser of the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia selected Hubbard and Birchler to show their work in the exhibition “Women of Venice” at the Pavilion of Switzerland. The exhibition explores the historical absence of artist Alberto Giacometti in the Swiss Pavilion at the Biennale. The artist was considered one of the most influential Swiss artists of the 20th century, but he repeatedly declined requests to represent Switzerland in the Venice Biennale.

In their work, Hubbard and Birchler use a documentary approach to delve into the archaeology of film. At the Biennale, they will present their film installation “Flora,” based on discoveries made in the course of their research on the largely unknown American artist Flora Mayo, who studied in Paris in the 1920s at the same time as Giacometti and became his lover. By weaving together fictional and documentary material, the artists reconstruct and re-imagine Flora Mayo’s life and work, while giving voice to her previously unknown son. Giacometti and Mayo’s relationship and their ensuing portrait reflect the creative energy generated by their collaborative artistic activity and also shed light on Giacometti’s early life.

This is the second time that Hubbard and Birchler have been invited to exhibit their work at the Venice Biennale. In 1999, curator Harald Szeemann invited them to participate in his group exhibition at the Giardini, “dAPERTutto.”


Production still from Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler’s Giant, 2014, 3-channel video installation; at Ballroom Marfa.


For the UT community, Hubbard and Birchler’s work will be on view at The Blanton Museum of Art in the summer of 2017 with Giant. “We are so fortunate to have internationally recognized artists Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler based in Austin and look forward to having Giant on view at the Blanton as their newest film debuts in the 2017 Venice Biennale,” writes Veronica Roberts, curator of modern and contemporary art at The Blanton.

Giant (2014), a three-channel video, takes as its subject a decaying movie set built outside of Marfa, TX for the 1956 Warner Bros. film Giant starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean. After the filming was completed, the three-sided façade was left behind in the landscape. “Hubbard and Birchler explore the skeletal remains of the set as seasons change, day turns to night, and parts of the structure swing and fall off,” Roberts writes. “Scenes of a film crew recording the current conditions are juxtaposed with a Warner Bros. office in 1955, where a secretary types up the location contract for the motion picture that has yet to be created.” Giant will open to the campus and Austin community on July 9, 2017.
 

Associate Professor Nassos Papalexandrou Shares Research Findings in Menil Symposium

Wed. November 9, 2016

objects from early greek art
Image and copyright credit: Nassos Papalexandrou

Nassos Papalexandrou, associate professor of Greek Art and Archaeology presented the results of his latest research in a symposium organized by the Menil Collection, Houston, TX, Rice University and University of Houston-Clear Lake (Collaborative Futures for Museum Collections: Antiquities, Provenance and Cultural Heritage, October 17-19, 2016). Papalexandrou’s paper is titled “Collecting Greek antiquities in the ‘60s: a group of Early Greek bronze horses in the Menil Collection.” The symposium presented the findings of scholars participating in the Collections Analysis Collaborative project (CAC), a research and educational initiative spearheaded by Rice University professor John Hopkins, a Ph.D. graduate of the art history doctoral program at the University of Texas at Austin. CAC aims at investigating questions of cultural heritage in order to produce a deep, historical understanding of nearly 600 objects from the ancient Mediterranean in the Menil’s permanent collection. Papalexandrou investigated John and Dominique de Menil’s interest in Early Greek art and how it dovetails with their parallel interests in African and modern art and especially surrealism.

Julia Guernsey Published in Latin American Antiquity

Mon. October 3, 2016

Society for American Archaelegy journal
 

Art History Professor Dr. Julia Guernsey's paper, "Water, Maize, Salt, and Canoes: Iconography, Economics, and Commodities at Late Preclassic Izapa" was published in the October 2016 journal Latin American Antiquity from the Society for American Archaeology

In Memorium: Adam Boley

Thu. October 13, 2016

woman swimming in water
 

On Sunday, September 4, 2016, our community suffered the loss of a faculty member and alumnus, Adam Boley (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2016).

Boley graduated from our M.F.A. program in Studio Art the spring of 2016 and came to the Department of Art and Art History staff in the Fall semester as a lecturer in photography. During his time with the department, Boley assisted artist Ann Hamilton in the execution of her work for the Dell Medical Center, O N E E V E R Y O N E. “I have many very beautiful photographs of Adam from the photography sessions for Dell,” writes Hamilton. “I think they capture—something in him, a lightness and weight, reflectivity, a humor. I watched him work with everyone we photographed, how he put everyone at ease and made the air lighter with his empathy. I will never watch a duck land down in water without thinking of him.”
 

two ducks
 

Boley earned his undergraduate degree in Photography at St. Edwards University in Austin. His work has been in numerous exhibitions, including those at Time Waste Management in Orlando, Florida (2016); The Mom Gallery, Austin; 60 Orange St, Providence, Rhode Island (2015); Locker 95, Austin (2015); and Pump Project Art Complex in Austin (2014).

He was born and raised on a ranch outside of Georgetown, TX, and his work reflects a connection to the landscape and history of the state. “Texas was a central character in his work,” said Department of Art and Art History Chair Jack Risley. “He was able to channel the friction between its historic myth and its suburban present in work that captured both the serenity and violence of the rural landscape.”

Service for Boley took place in early September in Georgetown, TX.
 

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