Department of Art and Art History Studio Art

Jason Urban and Leslie Mutchler’s latest exhibition debuts at Cork Printmaker’s FIRST EDITION Print Symposium

Fri. June 16, 2017

illuminated pink neon in abstract shape
 

On June 16, Leslie Mutchler and Jason Urban will open their exhibition, Babel Unbound, in association with the Cork Printmakers’ FIRST EDITION Print Symposium. Mutchler and Urban have been serving as artists in residence in Cork, Ireland during the month of June and will discuss their creative methodologies and approach to an expanded field of print at the symposium on June 23-24, 2017. 

Their new body of work, Babel Unboundfocuses on ephemeral editions, prints and printed multiples within the context of the library as a curated, collaborative and performed space.

A series of printed works, risographs, xeroxes and screenprints become a publication pulled apart, ephemeral and in-flux, lining walls. Photographs, 3D printed objects and large-scale digital prints break up the monotony of the splayed publication and help to loosely connect, by thread, by memory, by mark, pieces of text, re-paginated essays, screen-captured images, and scans of book spreads. The gallery becomes a circular space without hierarchy; with no beginning and no end; a confused noise made by a number of voices- babel unbound.

image of a cave wall with a single channel video on capture of person turning pg
Performing the Book, Leslie Mutchler and Jason Urban, 2017

Performing the Book, a single-channel video, explores both the tactile handling of Babel Unbound, while bound, and references the magenta-fingered scanning process at Google Books Library Project. With the book in motion, relationships emerge and disapate within seconds, making the magic of browsing visible and highly aesthetic.

gallery wall and pillars with exhibition and booklets lining wall
 

Mutchler and Urban’s work will be on view at the CIT Wandesford Quay Gallery from June 16 – July 8, 2017. 


 

Hyperallergic reviews Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler work at Venice Biennale

Wed. June 7, 2017

black and white image of a woman carving a bust out of clay
Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, “Flora” (2017), film still, synchronized double-sided film installation with sound, 30 mins, loop (courtesy the artists, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York and Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin)


Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler's latest work Flora (2017) was featured in a review from Gregory Volk of Hyperallergic. Housed within the Swiss pavilion at this year's Venice Biennale, Hubbard and Birchler's film installation was a response to renowned Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti's historical absence within the history of the Swiss pavilion and his exhibition at the French pavilion in 1956 titled Women of Venice

Teresa Hubbard Receives Honorary Doctoral Degree from Nova Scotia College of Art & Design

Sun. April 30, 2017

portrait of a brunette woman and a man both wearing glasses and turned toward us
Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler

Nova Scotia College of Art & Design (NSCAD) University honored UT Austin Professor Teresa Hubbard and colleague Alexander Birchler with honorary Doctorates of Fine Arts degrees at its 2017 Graduation Ceremony for their outstanding contribution to art and culture. 

When Hubbard and Birchler completed their MFA degrees at NSCAD in 1992, they were the first artists in North America to have earned MFA degrees based entirely on a collaborative practice and collaborative thesis. They continue to see success with this collaborative model of practice, including a recent invitation to showcase their work at the 57th annual Venice Biennale

New works by alumnus Miguel A. Aragón featured in new book and special exhibition in Peenemünd

Mon. March 20, 2017

a man maneuvering pipes across sheets of print paper


In 2015, Gregorio Iglesias Mayo and Miguel A. Aragón (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2014) spent the entire summer at the Historical-Technical Museum Peenemünd. They would contribute to a historical exhibition at the site, Wunder mit Kalkül:Die Peenemünder Fernwaffenprojekte als Teil des deutschen Rüstungssystems (loosely translated as Miracle with calculus: The Peenemünde missile weapons projects as part of the German defense system) and are currently exhibiting together in a contemporary exhibition of their own works titled Imprinting History.

It is worthy of note that the Historical-Technical Museum Peenemünd is not technically an art museum, but a museum born of the historical significance of the site of Peenemünd. The site served as a power plant back in the WWII era and later was used during Soviet occupation of East Germany. In recent years, parts of facilities have been re-configured as gallery spaces for permanent historical and rotating contemporary exhibitions that speak to the historical, cultural and human aspects of the site. It was at Peenemünd that early rocket technology was developed by one of Germany’s leading scientists, Wernher von Braun, who would later secretly move to the United States and work with NASA to put man on the moon.

“The Historisch-Technisches Museum Peenemünde is a place charged with history, which altered human existence,” writes Aragón on the Till Richter Museum website. “It is a place that was built solely on the fact of its potential, which would never be fully reached until after the end of the Second World War. I am attracted to this relentless drive to realize the impossible despite the constant failures.”

What began as just the inclusion of a few pieces that Aragón and Mayo produced on site during their residency in a historical exhibition for the museum’s permanent galleries has turned into Imprinting History, a group exhibition of work from the two resident artists. Covering the museum grounds, Aragón would utilize the dust, earth and rust in his cyanotype process to imprint the land itself onto each print sheet.

Reflecting on the work in the exhibition, Aragón writes, “This body of work [created for the Historical-Technical Museum Peenemünd] is connected to my research as an artist, research that explores attempts to capture and freeze a specific moment, the marks of time, conveying the transitory nature of memory, reflecting on the process of recollection, fading memory and alluding to the transitory nature of human existence.”

A courtyard-length painting by Mayo, a large installation by Aragón as well as the documentation by the Catalan photographer Gala Oró will be exhibited in the Turbine Hall of the power plant Peenemünde from May 2016 to August 2017.

See more from the exhibition and Aragón at work in the video from the Till Richter Museum.
 

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