Department of Art and Art History Studio Art

Studio Art Professor Troy Brauntuch among 1980s artists highlighted in T Magazine feature on Pictures Generation

Fri. February 24, 2017

dark red drawing of figures close to floorboards
Troy Brauntuch, “Floor Boards,” 1984, pastel and conte on cotton, 108 in. x 144 in., courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York
 
Troy Brauntuch was featured in New York Times' T magazine for contribution to the Pictures Generation, artists of the 1980s heralded by the publication for their continued significance.
 


 

Michael Smith traces origins of Baby Ikki persona in screening and panel conversation at Museum Brandhorst

Mon. February 27, 2017

A man facing the horizon dressed in diaper stares at desert sun
 
Transmedia professor Michael Smith will be speaking on a panel with art historian Helmut Draxler and artists Peter Wächtler and Jutta Zimmermann at the end of March. Panel discussion will focus on panelist engagement with post-apocalyptic narratives in their work.

The March 31 panel and screenings are among a series hosted by Museum Brandhorst titled “Post-Apocalyptic Realism: It’s After the End of the World. Don’t You Know That?”, which brings together artists who, “[take] the fragile status of mankind in the world as their starting point,” as the museum’s press relates. “Post-apocalyptic stories are also a continuation of one of modernity’s essential narratives: the narrative of the self which has lost its ground and place in a world that has long been out of joint. They are directed at a possible future while at the same time being profoundly anchored in the given reality of the present and past.”

In a description of Smith’s work and contribution to discussion, Museum Brandhorst’s program details,

“For over thirty years, video/performance/installation artist Michael Smith has built an extensive body of work based on two performance personae: Mike, a hopeful innocent who continually falls victim to trends and fashions outside his reach; and Baby Ikki, an ambiguously aged toddler who follows his impulses down unsupervised and often precipitous paths. Both characters are convenient narrative vehicles for Smith to engage the tragicomic aspects of contemporary culture, teasing out facets of loneliness, consumerism, and measures of success and failure. Following the screening of Baby Ikki’s trip to the Burning Man Festival (“A Voyage of Growth and Discovery”, Michael Smith and Mike Kelley, 2010, 87min), Smith will trace the origins of each persona back to the mid-1970s, discussing how feminism, the silent majority, blandness and the media informed their separate and arrested development.”

More details about the series and Michael Smith can be found at e-flux and Museum Brandhorst.  

Syndicate content