Department of Art and Art History News

Shannon Faseler to Address Climate Change in New Work during Residency at Creative Centre, Stöðvarfjörður

Thu. November 10, 2016

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Lecturer in Studio Art Shannon Faseler has been invited to attend a fully-funded artist residency in Iceland at the Creative Centre, Stöðvarfjörður. In her work at the Centre, Faseler will be focusing on the environment and climate change while working on and around the largest glacier in Europe. She intends that the work produced will be ephemeral and site specific.

“My recent paintings and drawings use a formal language to express the difficulty of conceptualizing climate change,” writes Faseler about the work. “It is my intention while in Iceland to use the glacier itself as the ground for a series of images that redirect the viewer’s attention to the fragile nature of the ice. I also plan on collecting documentation in the form of photography and discussion with the local villagers. The local village has been under stress due to a decline in the fishing industry. I hope to understand how the change in environment has affected these individuals.”
 

Associate Professor Nassos Papalexandrou Shares Research Findings in Menil Symposium

Wed. November 9, 2016

objects from early greek art
Image and copyright credit: Nassos Papalexandrou

Nassos Papalexandrou, associate professor of Greek Art and Archaeology presented the results of his latest research in a symposium organized by the Menil Collection, Houston, TX, Rice University and University of Houston-Clear Lake (Collaborative Futures for Museum Collections: Antiquities, Provenance and Cultural Heritage, October 17-19, 2016). Papalexandrou’s paper is titled “Collecting Greek antiquities in the ‘60s: a group of Early Greek bronze horses in the Menil Collection.” The symposium presented the findings of scholars participating in the Collections Analysis Collaborative project (CAC), a research and educational initiative spearheaded by Rice University professor John Hopkins, a Ph.D. graduate of the art history doctoral program at the University of Texas at Austin. CAC aims at investigating questions of cultural heritage in order to produce a deep, historical understanding of nearly 600 objects from the ancient Mediterranean in the Menil’s permanent collection. Papalexandrou investigated John and Dominique de Menil’s interest in Early Greek art and how it dovetails with their parallel interests in African and modern art and especially surrealism.

Members of New Barbizon Painters to Complete Residency at UT Austin in Spring 2017

Mon. November 7, 2016

by Moriah Reyes

The Department of Art and Art History is pleased to embark upon a collaboration with the Israel Institute and The University of Texas at Austin’s Jewish Studies program to host the “New Barbizon School,” an Israeli artist collective in the Spring of 2017. The group comprises of five women artists who all studied and were trained in traditional art academies in the former Soviet Union, and later in Israel and Europe. The group takes its name from The Barbizon School that opposed the Romantic movement and formalism that dominated nineteenth-century art in favor of the style now known as French Realism, which focused on painting scenes from nature and rural life.

The New Barbizon School formed to offer their contemporary version of en-plein-air painting, attempting to create situations in which more traditional painting practices are celebrated. Painting in the field (i.e., en plein air) provides an unmediated encounter with the painted subject. In the duration of painting, the artist gets to observe a slice of people’s lives, talk to them and, for a short time, become a part of their world.

Though each artist in the Barbizon collective has their own independent career and style, their shared praxis relies on the rejection of a culture of perceived self-reflection in conceptual art and a hope to expand on the definition of what it means to be contemporary. Their methodology challenges the current art climate by mirroring contemporary reality, making art about their immediate environment while situating themselves within it.

The group travels to various parts of the country to paint their observations, creating work from an urban perspective. Instead of going to forests or fields, they have taken to the gritty streets of urban Haifa and Jerusalem. They actively seek out diverse, far-away locations such as Bedouin markets in Rahat, an army base in Negev and a refugee camp in Bethlehem, to bring those “forgotten ones,” like Israeli foreign workers or immigrants, from the background of the picture to the foreground. Though primarily concerned with the aesthetic subject, the New Barbizon members recognize the documentary element of their work and its political implications. Painting from reality becomes a construction, a political and social tool. The group’s own immigration from the former Soviet Union has made them sensitive to the challenges of integrating into Israeli society, adding a double conceptual layer to their work: on one hand they bring a socialist and collective spirit to the Israeli artistic scene, and on the other their Russian-identity reinforces their position of “isolated majority” within the Israeli population. While in residence, UT students will be given opportunities to join The New Barbizon Artists in painting and drawing from an urban perspective while discussing the cultural significance of this experience and its historical context.

The Schusterman Visiting Israeli Artist Program is bringing The New Barbizon School to UT to provide students a chance to work with the artist collective in The New Barbizon School’s chosen environment and techniques, outdoors from observation.

The residency is supported by the Israel Institute, which is dedicated to enhancing knowledge of study of modern Israel.
 

Alumnus Michael Wellen to Become New Curator of International Art at Tate

Mon. October 31, 2016

Michael Wellen portrait against floral background
Michael Wellen

Michael Wellen (M.A. in Art History, 2005 and Ph.D. in Art History, 2012) has recently been named the new curator of  International Art at Tate. Wellen completed his master's and doctorate degrees at The University of Texas in Modern and Contemporary Art with a focus on Latin America. He will be bringing this expertise and focus to his work with Tate. 

For more information, read the article announcing his appointment on artnet

Visual Art Studies Student Julia Caswell Competing in University-Wide Undergraduate Research Showdown

Fri. October 14, 2016

two viewers in a gallery listening to an audio guide and raising hands
 
By virtue of its pioneering experimentation with digital technologies, museum education has moved out from the periphery of conversations in education. Here at The University of Texas at Austin’s Department of Art and Art History, our Visual Art Studies undergraduates are given the resources and the mentorship to think big in terms of digital technology and the museum experience. Visual Art Studies senior Julia Caswell’s experience is a case study for what can be accomplished. Caswell is currently participating in the Texas Undergraduate Research Showdown, presenting her research into new strategies for digital engagement for museums through audio walks.

 

Be sure to check out Julia’s project and VOTE for her research to advance to the final round!


“Research plays an important role in the undergraduate Visual Art Studies (VAS) program,” writes assistant chair of the Art Education program Dr. Christina Bain. “Since our field examines questions that generally focus on people, learning, and creativity, qualitative research methodologies are well suited for this type of field-based research. VAS students have multiple opportunities to practice research strategies during their coursework and participate in the Undergraduate Research Showcase annually.”

We decided to interview Caswell to find out more. Interview conducted over email.

 

Could you explain a little bit about your project for Undergraduate Studies Texas Research Showdown?

Julia Caswell: My participation in the Undergraduate Studies Texas Research Showdown is bounded by two objectives. First, the competition’s video requirement asks students to explain their creative research to a general audience. Within the competition format, other students on campus can vote on their favorite entries in the competition and the top six applicants—three voted in by popular vote and three selected by a panel of UT judges—are invited to present their work to a live audience at the final round on Tuesday, November 15, 2016.

Secondly, my objective going into this project and this research was to investigate systematically how audio walks were designed, implemented as educational programs and studied in a museum setting. Which meant that, while interning as the School Groups Program Intern at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York, I proactively developed an audio walk. An audio walk is a digital program that you can use in an app-format that gives you interactive information to create an immersive experience with the work in the Cynthia C. Wainwright gallery. The design is meant to encourage engagement while directing viewers through the gallery, introduce children and their families to contemporary art, and utilize inquiry-based questions in the development of higher-level thinking, all while being easy-to-use and fun.

The implementation and testing were developed for the Children’s Museum of the Arts with their unique space and mission in mind. This is an idea I came up with while considering the needs of all the museum’s stakeholders, including the curators, administrators, teaching artists, art educators and most importantly the museum’s patrons. The museum was very open to the different avenues we could take with incorporating audio into their programming. With their willingness to try something new, I was able to create something that I feel really innovates and expands on best practices for education around contemporary art. 


What theoretical lens informed this project?

Some of the theory I was looking at was associated with engagement and experience. Similar to stories, audio walks have the enduring ability to capture one’s attention and engage it uniquely. Husserl and Bachelard’s conceptions of phenomenology play a role in this research and practice, specifically when we refer to reflection, first-person perspective and the kind of immediate reach of “the poetic image when it emerges into the consciousness as a direct product of the heart, soul and being of man, apprehended in his actuality" (Bachelard, 1964).

But also, I was looking at contemporary Canadian audio walk artist, Janet Cardiff and her understanding of phenomenology as connected to “user’s experience.” Cardiff uses simple and straightforward “technology to create a complex, virtual reality in which the 'real' becomes inseparable from the virtual” (Sohal, 2006, p. 73).

 

What other previous experiences have you had that led you to this field and this research?

It is hard to tell, at this point, what led me to this field and research. You know the old debate, which came first the chicken or the egg? I think the egg, for me, always comes before the chicken. I often have fully-formed pictures in my head and really just need others to enact them to make them real.

One experience that led me to this field and research was my involvement in the Intellectual Entrepreneurship (IE) Pre-Graduate School Internship last semester. My graduate mentor, Allison Clark, who now works in education at the Getty museum, worked with me on a multi-directional mentorship that engaged my passions. We crafted a syllabus and had a conversation in her office once a week. This informed everything I do and I am so thankful for this experience.

I can remember, after a reading about art and technology for a Visual Art Studies class and then having a conversation within a philosophy and criticism course, asking myself and my class, “How are we preparing future students?” It's not just technology as hardware anymore, it’s culture. It’s the way we communicate with one another and the environment that communication creates. For an educator, that becomes a question about the way we teach. So the question behind my research became: What drives today’s students to participate in educationally purposeful activities? What I found was an emphasis on personalized experience among new technologies. The experience of an audio walk is immersive and engaging. Audio walks challenge the user's sense of ordinary. Although an audio walk can be administered as a group, the emphasis of personal cognition is a dynamic tool audio walks employ. As a result, students feel a personal sense of relevance with the curriculum.

 

In the video, you describe a gap between theory and practice in contemporary museum education. Could you explain?

I think the field of art education is always trying to bridge the gap between theory and practice. My research is in response to what I observed in this particular museum. Twenty first century skills such as problem solving, creativity and communication play a huge role in what art educators do. In conversation with those I had the privilege to work with at CMA, I realized there was a gap between the theories contemporary art draws upon and the actual engagement of the visitors. They were having different conversations entirely. The educator and/or the art historian is normally the filler of that gap, whether by leading tours, programming or holding guided discussions of the work. But I wanted to take it a step further beyond the traditional didactic texts that accompany works in a museum. Audio walks can be a combination of the sound from the actual surroundings overlaid with sounds from past experiences, movie soundtracks, musical instruments, narrative, etc. Audio walks allow the viewer to embody the experience in a variety of ways and not only receive information. 
Additionally, the audio walk employs gamification as an engagement strategy. In the development of the audio walk, I used game-design elements and game-principles. Even something as simple as asking a young user to find all of the basketball hoops in a painting, can significantly increase the level of engagement with the work. At its heart, this research suggests the possibilities of reaching contemporary youth learners who are adept at technology and giving them a platform for learning through personal relevance.