Art History Courses

Details below are subject to change. Please confirm all information in the official Course Schedule.

Spring 2023 Courses

ARH 301
Introduction to the Visual Arts

Moyosore Okediji
MW 9–11
Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Internet

Jeffrey Chipps Smith
TTH 2–3 + Discussion Section
Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

This survey course explores art and human creativity. The class stresses visual literacy by examining how and why art is made. We shall examine both famous and less well known examples of painting, sculpture, prints, and architecture, among other arts, as we investigate the many roles that art plays in different world cultures.

ARH 302
Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art

Douglas Cushing
MW 10–11 + Discussion Section
Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

A study of selected visual works throughout the world from prehistoric time to 1400 CE.

ARH 303
Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art

Louis Alexander Waldman
MW 11–12 + Discussion Section
Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

Daisy Adams
TTH 5–6:30
Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

A study of selected visual works throughout the world from 1400 CE to the present.

ARH 321
Problems in Art Historical Research

Restricted to Art History Majors.


Michael Charlesworth
MW 11:30–1
Fulfills →  Writing flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

How do we as art historians and emerging art historians create art history from fragments? How do we define art? How do we define history? This course will focus on Nineteenth Century European painting and photography. Students will work together in small groups before writing their individual papers.


Ann Reynolds
TTH 11–12:30
Fulfills →  Writing flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

In this seminar we will focus on primary research: what it is, how it is done, and why it is a significant and foundational research practice for art historians. We will begin with a series of general practical and conceptual discussions of primary research and one of its central resources, the archive. The University of Texas campus is home to several of the world’s preeminent archival collections. We will use one of these collections, the Harry Ransom Center (HRC), as the basis for most of our weekly discussions, and you will be asked to develop a research project based on the primary research you will conduct there over course of the semester. Because the HRC’s collections are so wide-ranging and primary research itself can initially feel quite open-ended and amorphous, we will use the US based, but extremely eclectic and cosmopolitan magazine View (1940–1947), as a shared framework or “archive” for our discussions and your projects. The HRC has an almost complete run of the magazine and a significant amount of collections that are directly or indirectly related to it that can support a wide variety of topics and research interests.

ARH 329T
Art in the Age of Dante and Giotto

Ann Collins Johns
TTH 9:30–11
Fulfills →  VAPA and Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

In this course, we focus on the rich artistic and architectural history of late medieval Italy (1200-1400), an era closely associated with the great poet Dante and the artistic achievements of the age’s most famous artist, Giotto. Geographically, we explore the art of late medieval Rome, Pisa, Assisi, Siena, Florence, and the imperial court of Frederick II in southern Italy. Artistically, we examine the work of artists as diverse as Arnolfo di Cambio, Giovanni Pisano, Pietro Cavallini, and the prodigiously talented Lorenzetti brothers, as well as the anonymous creators of frescoes at sites as varied as Assisi, Pisa, and Sant’Angelo in Formis.

Through lectures, discussions, and group work, we learn that the art of the era is inextricably linked to the tumult of this pivotal moment in Italian history, much of which is chronicled in Dante’s encyclopedic account. While we as a class focus on the extraordinary artistic output of the later middle ages in Italy, the continuing battles between church and state, the rise of the wealthy bourgeois merchants, and the devastating plague of 1348 ensures that we also delve into social, economic, and cultural issues of the era, punctuated by occasional readings (in English) from Dante.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 400–1500
Geographic Area — Europe & Mediterranean

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 600–1500
Geographic Area — Europe

ARH 333L
The Age of Rembrandt and Rubens: Northern Baroque Art

Jeffrey Chipps Smith
TTH 9:30–11
Fulfills →  VAPA
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

This course explores Northern European art between 1580 and 1720. The focus will be on the Golden Age of Netherlandish art and culture as we investigate the creativity of Rembrandt, Jan Vermeer, Frans Hals, Judith Leyster, Rubens, and Anthony van Dyck, among other great masters. We shall discuss other major artistic centers, such as Paris and Versailles during the reign of King Louis XIV. This was also a period in which the world opened up to Europeans as explorers and merchants brought back knowledge, art, erotic wares, and natural wonders from Asia, Africa, and the Americas. These encounters enriched the Netherlands, among other lands, but often at a human cost.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Europe & Mediterranean

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Europe

ARH 341P
Contemporary Latin American Art

Adele Nelson
TTH 11–12:30
Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

It is an exciting moment of heightened visibility for postwar & contemporary Latin American art in the United States. This course will take advantage of the University’s rich Latin American art collections to study artwork first-hand and examine South American art and critical debates from 1945 to the present in particular depth. Taking advantage of new research, to which you will contribute, we will also work to redress the exclusion of Caribbean and Central American art and Afro-descendant and Indigenous creators from the study of art of Latin America. Attention will be paid to transnational artistic exchanges, including the role of new art institutions, such as the São Paulo and Havana Biennials. We will consider Latin America-based artists in their distinct contexts and in relation to broader political, social, and economic forces, among these violent dictatorial governments and the Cold War and its aftermaths.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Americas

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1900–Present
Geographic Area — The Americas

ARH 345L
Diaspora Visions

Moyosore Okediji
MW 12–1:30
Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag
Instruction Mode →  Internet

Border crossing by cultures and groups from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean islands has generated the production of images by immigrants, exiles, and nomads in alien lands. With examples drawn from various continents, class investigates art across borders in the contexts of the cultural circumstances that produced the diasporas. Students will investigate the arts of voluntary, forced, colonial, distant, and recent diasporas. Illustrations will draw on images, music, and videos.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Diaspora & Transcultural

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1900–Present
Geographic Area — Africa / Asia & Pacific / Europe / Middle East

ARH 348K
Formation of Indian Art

Janice Leoshko
TTH 12:30–2
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

Two thousand years ago “the wonder that was India” was well known not only elsewhere in Asia but as far away as Rome. This course examines the ways in which visual culture developed through the centuries as a result of India’s material and spiritual wealth. Themes to be examined include the constructions of sacred space that led to distinctive architectural traditions, the principles of image-making that resulted in elaborate iconographies and the entwined nature of political allegory and religious narrative in the works and monuments creted there up to 1500.How these visual forms were shaped by particular social and religious factors is an issue that will allow us to consider the relationships among India’s religious traditions (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism). Another focus of this class is upon understanding how we investigate and produce knowledge about the past and why this is important. Course carries a global flag.

The course broadly engages with the practices of art history and the ways in which it explores cultural differences. Students will become familiar with socio-historical and religious traditions in which multiple artistic traditions developed in South Asia.

Another facet of concern will be the ways in which the study of Indian art first developed and the colonial constraints upon this process. Assignments will involve creative thinking and analysis in order to evaluate material presented in lectures, discussions and readings.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — Prehistoric–400
Geographic Area — Asia & Pacific

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — Prehistoric–600 / 600–1500
Geographic Area — Asia & Pacific

ARH 361
Printmaking in the Americas

Adele Nelson
MW 9:30–11
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

Recent research notes the centrality of printmaking and its conceptual and material processes to not only art history, but also visual culture and visuality more broadly. This course examines 20th and 21st century printmaking in the Americas, taking advantage of the tremendous collections of Black, Latin American, and U.S. Latinx art at UT – at the Art Galleries at Black Studies, Benson Latin American Collection, Blanton Museum of Art, and Harry Ransom Center. The course also coincides with the exhibition Social Fabric: Art and Activism in Contemporary Brazil, an exhibition co-organized by Prof. Nelson, and we will study prints in the exhibition in-depth. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between art and activism and study a wide range of printed and paper things—books, magazines, mail art, photographs, posters—in addition to fine art prints.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Americas

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1900–Present
Geographic Area — The Americas

ARH 365
Baroque Art and the Imagination in Italy, 1600–1700

Louis Alexander Waldman
MW 12–1:30
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

Consult Course Schedule or inquire with instructor for course description and information.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Europe & Mediterranean

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1500–1900
Geographic Area — Europe

ARH 366J
Goya and Romanticism

Michael Charlesworth
MW 1:30–3
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

This course will study the work of the famous Spanish painter and print-maker, Francisco Goya (1746–1828). We shall start by considering his print series of the 1790s that satirize Spain’s Absolutist monarchy and aristocratic society. We’ll look at his anti-war works, and his famous last paintings on the walls of his house, grotesque and horrible as they are. The course will examine Goya’s works in relation to Romanticism, a pan-European literary and artistic movement. We shall also study the aftermath of Goya, including, but not limited to, the work of the famous French painter, Edouard Manet. In this way we shall also be able to judge whether Modernism was really a break with the past, or a continuation of elements of Romanticism. 3 in-house tests; 2 papers.


Art History Majors

For 2018–2020 and 2020–2022 Catalogs:
Time Period — 1500–Present
Geographic Area — Europe & Mediterranean

For 2022–2024 Catalog:
Time Period — 1500–1900
Geographic Area — Europe

ARH 375
Theories and Methods in the History of Art

Julia Guernsey
TTH 9:30–11
Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry and Writing flags
Instruction Mode →  Face-to-Face

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of art history and to some of the most significant methodological approaches and challenges to the study of art and visual culture. This course does not follow a lecture format but instead focuses on class discussion, active participation, and collaborative learning. Our goal is to become familiar with the fundamental characteristics and objectives of various methods and traditions in art history, and to create a productive environment in which to analyze, critique, compare, and utilize them. Because this class carries both Writing and Individual Inquiry flags, emphasis will also be placed on a series of written assignments and papers that enable the student to more fully research and explore a topic of particular art historical interest to her/him/them.

Prerequisite: ARH 321: Problems in Art Historical Research. Restricted to Art History Majors.

ARH 376
Independent Study: Art History

Individual projects to be completed under faculty supervision.

Requires consent of instructor to register.

Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry flag

ARH 379H
Art History Honors Thesis

Individual conference course in which student researches and writes a thesis.

Restricted to those participating in Art History Honors Program. Requires approval by Art History Honors Program Director to register.

Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry and Writing flags

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