Art History Courses

Details below are subject to change. Please confirm all information in the official Course Schedule.
 

Fall 2022 Teaching Formats

Online
Instruction mode "Internet" in course schedule. The course is taught entirely online and does not require in-person activities on campus.

Online with Required In-Person Component
Instruction mode "Hybrid or Blended" in course schedule. The course is a hybrid format that blends online instruction and required in-person activities on campus. Students may be divided into smaller groups for in-person instruction and will be advised by their instructor as to which days to report on campus.

In-Person
Instruction mode "Face-to-Face" in course schedule. The course is taught entirely in-person.

Fall 2022 Courses

ARH 301
Introduction to the Visual Arts

This survey course explores art and human creativity. The class stresses visual literacy by examining how and why art is made. We shall examine both famous and less well known examples of painting, sculpture, prints, and architecture, among other arts, as we investigate the many roles that art plays in different world cultures.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

Ann Johns
MW 10–11 + Discussion Section
Teaching Format →  Online with Required In-Person Component

Astrid Runggaldier
MWF 10–11
Teaching Format →  In-Person

Instructor TBA
TTH 5–6:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 302
Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art

Why did somebody scratch a chain of impeccably drawn diamonds on a chunk of red stone 77,000 years ago? Was the Egyptian Sphinx as enigmatic in antiquity as it is today? Why did the Greeks need images? Why did Islam negate figuration in its sacred spaces of worship? Why were the medieval cathedrals laden with cute but ominous monsters? There are no easy answers to these questions but works of art are fun to look at and think about. A chronological survey of the visual arts from the Stone Age to the end of the Medieval Period, this course will focus on major achievements of painting, sculpture, and architecture and on their roles as vehicles of expression for individuals and societies alike. Artistic creations have always enshrined a gamut of experiences and mental states: emotions, desires, fears, frustrations, power, repulsion, propaganda, memory, nostalgia, and play, to name but a few. Our goal will be to examine precisely how these elements were expressed in individual cultures, how they changed over time, and whether or not their messages are still recoverable today. Although major emphasis will be given to the western world, non-western developments will also be considered.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

Nassos Papalexandrou
TTH 11–12 + Discussion Section
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 303
Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art

Art is a language: how do we decode its meaning, its intent, and its extraordinary effect on us, the viewers? In this course, we explore an astonishing array of Western art and architecture. Our course begins c. 1250, in the early Renaissance of Western Europe, and concludes with global artistic trends and issues that are at the heart of the art world in 2020. While we will concentrate on the familiar media of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will also be looking at manuscripts, drawings, prints, photography, the decorative arts, garden planning, ceramics, earthworks, and installation art.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

Instructor TBA
MWF 11–12
Teaching Format →  In-Person

Instructor TBA
TTH 8–9:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 304
Issues in Visual Culture

Restricted to Art History Majors.

As the notions of participation and the efficacy of contemporary political art have attained renewed currency and urgency in art making and art historical debates in recent years, this class takes a critical look at the history, trajectory, and manifestations of art that involve spectator participation. The course, for majors in Art History, is neither a survey nor an art historical methods seminar, but instead a concept-driven exploration of contemporary art and visual culture. We will consider interactive art practices from the late 1950s until the present in Europe and the Americas that have variously been described as activism, community art, participatory art, political art, public art, relational aesthetics, social engaged art, and social practice, among others. Occasional study of printed and paper things — books, magazines, mail art, photographs, posters, prints — will interrupt our consideration of physically interactive and performative artistic projects to broaden and challenge current accounts of participatory art.

Fulfills →  Ethics flag / Independent Inquiry flag / Writing flag

Adele Nelson
MW 11:30–1
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 321
Problems in Art Historical Research

Restricted to Art History Majors.


In this seminar we will focus on primary research: what it is, how it is done, and why it is a significant and foundational research practice for art historians. We will begin with a series of general practical and conceptual discussions of primary research and one of its central resources, the archive. The University of Texas campus is home to several of the world’s preeminent archival collections. We will use one of these collections, the Harry Ransom Center (HRC), as the basis for most of our weekly discussions, and you will be asked to develop a research project based on the primary research you will conduct there over course of the semester. Because the HRC’s collections are so wide-ranging and primary research itself can initially feel quite open-ended and amorphous, we will use the US based, but extremely eclectic and cosmopolitan magazine View (1940-1947), as a shared framework or “archive” for our discussions and your projects. The HRC has an almost complete run of the magazine and a significant amount of collections that are directly or indirectly related to it that can support a wide variety of topics and research interests.

Fulfills →  Writing flag

Ann Reynolds
TTH 9:30–11
Teaching Format →  In-Person


How do we as art historians and emerging art historians create art history from fragments, or from that which has been marginalized, obscured, and rendered less than the hegemonic narratives that tend to dominate the canon of Art History? Art History has at its core a pronounced eurocentrism, within which is an inherently problematic framing of certain people - women, ethnic minorities and others - within the subaltern. What challenges do art historians face in their attempts to excavate wider art histories? How do we challenge the frankly racist practices that still lie at the heart of many institutions such as museums and sometimes, within academia itself? What methodologies might be employed? In sum, how do we create art history from that which is not immediately recognizable, accessible, or given status. The class will reflect on a wide range of texts, from Virginia Wolf’s A Room of One’s Own, through to Linda Nochlin’s “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” It will consider why artists primarily regarded by the dominant culture according to raced, or gendered constructs are and have been routinely and systemically marginalized within Art History. Students will each work towards a research project that reflects on, as well as seeks to overcome, problems of art historical research.

Fulfills →  Writing flag

Eddie Chambers
TTH 12:30–2
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 322
Issues in Exhibitions and Collections of Visual Arts: Before and Beyond Exhibitions

By considering how collections are made, students in this course engage with myriad factors that shape exhibitions and the resulting consequences. The course is devoted to developing an understanding of how temporary art exhibitions are staged and in what ways can they be evaluated. The questions covered include how exhibitions relate to broader collecting practices by individuals and institutions. One feature of this course is attention to the development of Asian collections and the exhibitions that were possible because of new attention to these artistic traditions. Related topics such as the importance of conservation practices are also addressed. Students will work directly with specific collections in UT’s Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and the Houston Museum of Fine Arts.

Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag / Writing flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 400-1500 or 1500-Present for Time Period and Asia & Pacific for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 600-1500, 1500-1900, or 1900-Present for Time Period and Asia & Pacific for Geographic Area.

Janice Leoshko
TTH 11–12:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 326M
Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greek Sanctuaries

The course investigates the Greek idea of sacredness and the material configuration of belief in the context of important Greek sanctuaries. Our focus will be on sacred space and the various frameworks around religious practices of individuals and communities alike: healing, coming-of-age, divination, athletics, sex, fertility, social identities. We will study major monuments of architecture, sculpture, and painting and their role as performative backdrops during which the Greeks communicated with their gods and with each other. By doing so we will concentrate on major artistic ideas and behavioral categories of a culture that is distant and alien to us but also familiar to some extent through the survival of the classical tradition. Major theme in the agenda include the nature of divinity, the role of sanctuaries as arenas for symbolic, competitive display of individuals and groups alike, the political dimensions of the archaeological exploration of the big sanctuaries (e.g. Olympia, Delphi) since the nineteenth century, the function of images in sacred space and why the sanctuaries epitomize a universal cultural heritage of paramount importance.

Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards Prehistoric-400 for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards Prehistoric-600 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Nassos Papalexandrou
TTH 2–3:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 328L
History of the Medieval Middle East in 100 objects

Objects, “things” – whether mundane, everyday household items or great works of art and architecture patronized by merchants, religious leaders, or rulers – have had a profound impact on the course of history. Indeed, recently historians have begun to speak of a “material turn” within the field – a movement away from a purely text-based model of understanding the past. This model acknowledges that things can often reveal a more nuanced and rich picture of past lives, in particular, allowing us to understand how ordinary people lived. And yet, history is often still taught as though our only source of knowledge about the past comes through texts. This course will be a survey of the history of the medieval Middle East, from the period of Late Antiquity (in the seventh century) to the beginning of the rise of early modern empires of the Safavids, Ottomans, and Mughals (in the seventeenth century), taught by a close examination of the meaning and significance of 100 objects. The objects will range from buildings to manuscripts to weapons and will come from diverse contexts, including archaeological investigations, museum collections, and European church treasuries. Yet all of them will tell a vivid story about the people of their time. Students will learn basic skills of visual analysis and object analysis, and will gain an introduction to theories of seeing and interpreting works of art and architecture – essential skills in today’s increasingly visually-based information economy. At the end of the course, students will not only have a clear sense of the histories of the great medieval Islamic dynasties and their various Zoroastrian, Christian, Jewish, and Hindu subjects, but will also be able to use works of art and architecture, as well as everyday objects, as an effective tool of analysis.

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 400-1500 for Time Period and Middle East & Africa for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards Prehistoric-600 or 600-1500 for Time Period and Middle East for Geographic Area.

Stephennie Mulder
MWF 12–1
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 331K
Early Italian Renaissance Art to 1470

Renaissance means “rebirth”, and the rebirth of art and culture is a concept that was very vividly alive in fifteenth-century Italy. This course looks at the great artists and innovations of the period that spans:
…from Brunelleschi to Bramante in architecture
…from Masaccio to Botticelli to Leonardo in painting
…from Donatello to the young Michelangelo in sculpture
Among the issues to be discussed will be: the development of mathematical perspective, art and engineering, the revival of ancient Greek and Roman culture, the role of women in society, religion, gender and sexuality, politics and warfare, technology and science—and how all these themes are reflected in important works of art.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 400-1500 for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 600-1500 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Louis Waldman
TTH 9:30–11
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 331P
Art & The City in Renaissance Italy

Florence, Venice, Siena: the cultural landscape of Italy is dominated by cities so rich in artistic treasures that any one example is worthy of a whole course. We begin with the most famous Renaissance city-state, Florence. We will explore the development of art and architecture in civic, ecclesiastic, monastic, palatial, and private settings, from Brunelleschi’s dome to private, secular decoration in the city’s palazzi. We will then examine the cities of Venice and Siena; each of these cities is distinguished by its own unique style of art and architecture. We’ll study Italy’s “court” cities, including Ferrara, Mantua, and Urbino. We’ll observe the unique sense of “place” that distinguishes these communities, but we’ll also discover cultural, artistic, and urban commonalities throughout Renaissance Italy.

We’ll also examine issues such as the role of women and the family; the importance of race and international trade; the rise of specialized hospitals and quarantine islands in an era of plague; and the delicate balance between the growing urban centers and the control of the surrounding territory, so necessary for crops and other resources.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 600-1500 or 1500-1900 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Ann Johns
MWF 1–2
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 332K
Northern Renaissance Art 1350–1500

This course traces the origins and first flowering of the Renaissance in Northern Europe from the late Gothic royal courts of France and Bohemia to the stunning realism of Jan van Eyck and emotionalism of Rogier van der Weyden to lyrical pictures of Hans Memling and Gerard David to the apocalyptic visions of Hieronymus Bosch and the fantastic sculpted altarpieces of Germany. Since much of the surviving art is religious, we shall examine its liturgical and theological functions and how the art relates to the ideas of Thomas à Kempis and the Modern Devotion movement. This brilliant period witnessed the invention of prints and book publishing, developments that dramatically transformed contemporary attitudes about art and its uses.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 400-1500 for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 600-1500 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Jeffrey Chipps Smith
MW 8:30–10
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 335G
Art and Landscape 1778–1903

Embracing the period between the invention, by a woman, of a new form of art – the landscape garden - and the deaths of the painters Paul Gauguin and James Whistler, this course emphasizes the connections between landscape and mental process. The French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau's thoughts about the Revolutionary potential of doing nothing in a beautiful landscape space will help to guide us towards consideration of gardening, painting and drawing, and literature, including poetry, all of which will furnish material for our investigation.

Landscape is the place where everything happens. This course studies all the arts of landscape in Europe during the period covered: painting, gardening, and poetry. We will note the exchange of artistic energies between nations, especially, but not exclusively, between Britain and France. From Romanticism (Blake, Goya, Friedrich) to Impressionism and the Symbolists such as Gauguin, landscape becomes the testing-ground for insights not only into nature, but also into the character of being human.

Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1500-1900 or 1900-Present for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Michael Charlesworth
MW 10–11:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 335R
Burne–Jones and Friends

During the second half of the nineteenth century, the painter and illustrator Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) became a household name in Great Britain. He was also acclaimed as a Symbolist in France, and known in the USA. This course will study his work with particular attention to 1) Medievalism, and 2) his psychological insights. Both of these themes were fantastic. Imagining medieval times as a fantasy of a better world, a parallel and more fulfilling universe, was a phenomenon much larger than the work of any one person, but the work of Burne-Jones became central to it.

In addition to his work in painting, drawing, tapestry design and book illustration we will consider selected work by his friends. His friends included the sculptress Maria Zambaco, and were mainly a) the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and associates, especially Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the poet A. C. Swinburne; and b) the Arts and Crafts community, with William Morris at its centre. The course considers this group of artists as cultural rebels and political radicals (Socialists, feminists, Marxists). Morris, Swinburne and Rossetti were all poets, and we will be reading some of their poetry.

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1500-1900 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Michael Charlesworth
MW 1–2:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 339M
American Art 1958–1985

This course surveys American artistic production from 1958 to 1985. We will look at the work of selected artists associated with the major trends, including pop art, minimalism, conceptual art, site-specific art, performance and body art, photorealism, patterning and decoration, and the varieties of figural art that emerged in the 1980s, including neo-expressionism, graffiti, narrative, and appropriation. We will examine these trends from three principal points of view: their relationship to prior historical developments, their self-stated aims, and their treatment by contemporary critics.

Fulfills →  VAPA

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Americas for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1900-Present for Time Period and The Americas for Geographic Area.

John Clarke
TTH 2–3:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 341L
Chicano Art Histories and Futures

Mexican American art since the 1960s, with an emphasis on the visual production and exhibition of identities inside and outside the Chicano civil rights movement and the politics of U.S. multiculturalism.

Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag / Independent Inquiry flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Americas for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1900-Present for Time Period and The Americas for Geographic Area.

George Flaherty
MW 4–5:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 344J
Twentieth-Century African American Art

The class will focus on the fascinating work of African-American artists during a century that in its second decade witnessed the ‘Harlem Renaissance’ of the 1920s and several decades later gave rise to the ‘Black Arts Movement’ of the mid – late 1960s to early to mid 1970s. The Harlem Renaissance stands as a towering moment of American creativity and will figure prominently in our class syllabus. Our class, African-American Artists of the 20th Century will present and discuss work that is as varied as the practitioners responsible for it. Sculpture, printmaking, painting, figurative, non-figurative, trained, untrained; the variations are almost endless. The period of time under discussion witnessed hugely important developments of African American history. The ‘Great Migration of people from the south to the northern industrial centers, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, all these factors and many more have their part to play in the absorbing history of African American artists of the 20th century. The work of a number of highly accomplished artists will be considered, from Aaron Douglas and William H. Johnson to Dana Chandler, Elizabeth Catlett, and Faith Ringgold. The class will also seek to put the work of these artists into a variety of the wider political, social and cultural contexts that made the 20th century such an important period for African-American people and also for America itself.

Fulfills →  Cultural Diversity flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Americas for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1900-Present for Time Period and The Americas for Geographic Area.

Eddie Chambers
TTH 3:30–5
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 346K
Introduction to African Art

This course is a comprehensive study of the visual arts of Africa, in the social and cultural contexts within which people make and use these images. Students will explore historical, contemporary, and diasporic aspects of African art, as part of a larger expressive complex that includes music, dance, literature, and cinematography.  The course will present the works of major artists, art groups, ethnicities, and communities, as a lively dialog between the creative imaginations of those who make the objects, and the philosophical responses of those to whom the artists address the objects.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Cultural Diversity flag / Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Middle East & Africa for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards all time periods for Time Period and The Americas for Geographic Area.

Moyo Okediji
TTH 2–3:30
Teaching Format →  Online

ARH 346L
Africana Women’s Art

Can we adopt the criteria used for the analysis and presentation of western art and artists for the analysis and presentation of works by Africana women artists? How do we define Africana women’s art and artists? Who are the most influential Africana women artists, and in which mediums do they work? What tasks do they tackle and what challenges face them? What are the stylistic diversities that define and distinguish their contributions? What are the technological tools available to them, and how have they manipulated and fashioned these tools? How have they shaped the past and present trends in art history, and what are their aspirations and hopes for the future? These are some of the questions that this course will investigate with the use of art historical and critical theories that draw on oral and written literatures, music, films, and other formal and informal documents.

Fulfills →  VAPA

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Middle East & Africa for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1500-1900 or 1900-Present for Time Period and Africa for Geographic Area.

Moyo Okediji
TTH 9:30–11
Teaching Format →  Online

ARH 348N
Buddhist Art in Asia and Elsewhere in the World

This course considers Buddhist art throughout the world and how various visual traditions arose as the religion spread outside India where it originated. The significant question of what defines “art” and its power culturally and socially are at the center of our examination of the diverse visual traditions associated with Buddhism. Especial focus is upon the transformation of Buddhist art as the religion reached Southeast Asia and eventually East Asia. In each region indigenous cultural practices and artistic traditions influenced the specific forms developed. The class will thus consider how different forms of Buddhism arose that resulted in distinct forms of imagery such of Buddha images and cosmic realms. The political uses of Buddhist art and the development of pilgrimage, both in the past and the present, represent the range of themes to be covered.

Fulfills →  VAPA / Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards Prehistoric-400 for Time Period and Asia & Pacific for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards Prehistoric-600, 600-1500, or 1500-1900 for Time Period and Asia & Pacific for Geographic Area.

Janice Leoshko
TTH 2–3:30
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 362
Ancient Lives of Roman Buildings

Taking a broad view of Roman architecture from Republic to Empire, this lecture course examines different phases of ancient buildings’ lives, from construction to restoration to demolition, with a view to determining their political valencies at these moments. Readings will cover issues such as construction process, damnatio memoriae (condemnation of memory) and vandalism, drawing on examples from, and scholarship on, diverse periods and cultures. Participants are encouraged, in turn, to bring expertise/interests of their own to the discussion.

Fulfills →  Global Cultures flag

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards Prehistoric-400 for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards Prehistoric-600 for Time Period and Europe for Geographic Area.

Penelope Davies
TTH 3:30–5
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 366P
Color in Theory and Practice

Explore contemporary color notation systems and color management techniques. Survey economic, health and safety, environmental, cultural, legal, political, and other ethical considerations pertinent to using color.

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean or Americas for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1900-Present for Time Period and Europe or The Americas for Geographic Area.

Carma Gorman
TTH 11–12:30
Teaching Format →  Consult Course Schedule

ARH 374
History of Graphic Design

Consult Course Schedule or inquire with instructor for course description and information.

For Art History majors in 2018-2020, 2020-2022 Catalog years, this course counts towards 1500-Present for Time Period and Europe & Mediterranean or Americas for Geographic Area. For Art History majors in the 2022-2024 Catalog year, this course counts towards 1500-1900 or 1900-Present for Time Period and Europe or The Americas for Geographic Area.

Carma Gorman
TTH 12:30–2
Teaching Format →  Consult Course Schedule

ARH 375
Theories and Methods in the History of Art

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of art history and to some of the most significant methodological approaches and challenges to the study of art and visual culture. This course does not follow a lecture format but instead focuses on class discussion, active participation, and collaborative learning. Our goal is to become familiar with the fundamental characteristics and objectives of various methods and traditions in art history, and to create a productive environment in which to analyze, critique, compare, and utilize them. Because this class carries both Writing and Individual Inquiry flags, emphasis will also be placed on a series of written assignments and papers that enable the student to more fully research and explore a topic of particular art historical interest to her/him/them.

Prerequisite: ARH 321: Problems in Art Historical Research. Restricted to Art History Majors.

Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry flag / Writing flag

Michael Charlesworth
TTH 9:30–11
Teaching Format →  In-Person

ARH 376
Independent Study: Art History

Individual projects to be completed under faculty supervision.

Requires consent of instructor to register.

Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry flag

ARH 379H
Art History Honors Thesis

Individual conference course in which student researches and writes a thesis.

Restricted to those participating in Art History Honors Program. Requires approval by Art History Honors Program Director to register.

Fulfills →  Independent Inquiry flag / Writing flag

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