Department of Art and Art History News

Visual Art Studies students intern across the world, from San Marcos and Austin to New York and Italy

Mon. September 5, 2016

 

Work from students at Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos
Work from students at Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos

Junior Tanya Gantiva and Senior Paulina Dosal-Terminel, Visual Art Students undergraduates, worked at the Indigenous Cultures Institute in San Marcos. Gantiva and Dosal-Terminel interned as art directors for the institute’s free summer camp for youth. As a part of the Indigenous Cultures Institute’s mission to research and preserve indigenous culture, the summer camp offers youth a chance to learn about indigenous arts and their indigenous identities through hands-on workshops and projects.

“The whole process was such an incredible learning experience for me as an educator, artist and human being,” Paulina Dosal-Terminel writes. “Teaching art using indigenous methods, as well as working with a group of extremely talented individuals to guide students' on a path of learning that is both encouraging of individuality and conscious of the collective home we all share, really opened my eyes to how art is present in every moment of our lives.”


Madi Beavers (Visual Art Studies, 2018) interned at The Contemporary in Austin, working with the museum’s teen program. Over the course of the summer, Beavers learned the ins and outs of writing teacher materials and designing educational initiatives tailored toward a teen demographic. Ultimately, Beavers and her team of high school students created inventive zines as a product of their experiments, discussion and experience.


Julia Caswell at CMA
Julia Caswell at CMA

Julia Caswell (Visual Art Studies, 2017) had a fantastic summer internship as a School Programs Intern for The Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York (CMA). Working in collaboration with other nonprofits and arts organizations in New York, Caswell facilitated art-making inspired by interdisciplinary themes of CMA exhibits. Her work on a public art mural project is highlighted on the Children’s Museum of Art’s website.

 


Lastly, Visual Art Studies students traveled to Italy with Art History professor Dr. Ann Johns and made a brave journey to see Christo’s Floating Piers.

Through these internships, Visual Art Studies students are given the opportunity to practice pedagogy in the field, exploring the connections between trends in visual arts and contemporary art education.
 

Dr. George Flaherty releases new book exploring civil unrest and cultural revolution during 1968 Olympic games

Wed. August 31, 2016

Dr. George Flaherty
Dr. George Flaherty

University of California Press has published Art History professor Dr. George Flaherty's Hotel Mexico: Dwelling on the '68 Movement. Initially a dissertation, Flaherty's book explores the ways that events surrounding the 1968 Olympic games in Mexico served as the field for a dramatic upheaval in Mexican culture and how the city itself became a medium of communication.


Flaherty will be discussing his book with Laura Gutierrez, of the Department of Theater and Dance, at the LLILAS Faculty Book Presentation on September 2, 2016 at noon at the Benson Latin American Collection.  

Assistant Professor Nicole Awai included in exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery in New York

Fri. August 19, 2016

 A detailed look at Awai's piece titled, "I Vant To Be An A-Lone Star"
Nicole Awai, I Vant To Be An A-Lone Star, 2011 (detail)
 

Assistant professor Nicole Awai was featured in Sploch, a two-venue exhibition on the Lower East Side curated by Eileen Jeng. The exhibition was on view at Sperone Westwater Gallery from July 7 - August 12, 2016.

Splotch featured artists whose work involves a methodical and controlled process of creating seemingly free form or random daubs and spots. The title of the exhibition is inspired by Sol LeWitt’s fiberglass pieces titled Splotches and the working drawings or “footprints.” Lewitt’s 12-foot long sculpture Splotch #3, 2000, which was previously shown at The Met in 2005, and the working drawings will be exhibited for the first time at Lesley Heller Workspace, the other venue of the exhibition.

Splotch includes works by Nicole Awai, Lynda Benglis, Trudy Benson, Matias Cuevas, Lucky DeBellevue, Alex Dodge, Mary Heilmann, Andreas Kocks, Sol LeWitt, Emil Lukas, Riad Miah, Takesada Matsutani, Landon Metz, Angel Otero, Otto Piene, David Reed, Taney Roniger, Brie Ruais, Julia von Eichel, Terry Winters, and Jian-Jun Zhang.

  

Interview with Erica Baum

Tue. July 19, 2016

red photograph of a woman juxtaposed with book pages
Erica Baum, "Investigation", 2014

Erica Baum was previously exhibited in The Visual Arts Center in 2012. This interview shows her unique perspective on the intersection of text and image.

 

 

David Brooks Presents Solo Exhibition in Connecticut

Thu. June 23, 2016

TAGS
man peaks through sculpture
Mr. Brooks looks through his piece ‘Migratory Species (Habitat Formation)’. Photo by: Michelle Mcloughliln

Continuous Service Altered Daily is a site-engaged sculptural array, or, as David Brooks refers to it, an “asteroid field without a distinctive beginning or end.” Brooks has disemboweled a beacon of agricultural technology, a 1976 John Deere 3300 series combine harvester, into hundreds of individual components, ranging from the iconic and specific to the common and standard. He has arranged every part, with not a single piece excluded, in an ambling procession that begins in the Museum’s front plaza, winds through the Atrium, front first-floor galleries, the inner courtyard, and ends in the Sculpture Garden. The project is understood as one continuous action that is expressed in a myriad of sculptural moments. From the macro to the micro, Brooks’s installation concurrently zooms in and out of view, wedging us inside the far off and the up close.

Brooks’s method of presentation offers the machine’s shell and innards in varying degrees of material transformation: 1) in its weathered condition, but with its trademark John Deere green still visible; 2) sandblasted to remove all evidence of wear and tear, returning the object back to its material origin; 3) brass plated; 4) powder coated, elevating the individualized status of the pieces as precious objects. Brooks uses the distinctive form and function of the disassembled combine analogously, allowing it to mirror the philosophical impasse at which we find ourselves as our hyperkinetic era faces an escalating ecological crisis.

David Brooks was previously an Artist-In-Residence of The Visual Arts Center in 2014. Continuous Service Altered Daily is open at The Aldrich Contemporary Art until February 5, 2017.