Department of Art and Art History News

Leah Dyjak present solo exhibition at pump project

Sat. May 14, 2016

photograph of rocks tinted white
Image courtesy of the artist.

Coastliners: Leah Dyjak (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2015) will be on view at pump project April 29 – May 14, 2016.

Zack Ingram (M.F.A. candidate in Studio Art) presents work at grayDUCK gallery

Sat. May 7, 2016

print of flower pattered cloth one clothes line
Image courtesy.

Zach Ingram (M.F.A. candidate in Studio Art) presents work in a two person exhibition at grayDUCK gallery. The exhibition will be on view May 7 – June 5, 2016. An opening reception will be held May 7, 7–10 p.m.

Current Affairs explores the dichotomy of looking to the future and exploring your past. Rachel Bury is investigating the future with her unconventional paintings and science fiction attractions. Ingram’s work touches on how his past and ancestors affect him and his process. Both artists are dexterous, inventive sculptors that use material and paint in innovative ways.

Ingram states:

This body of work uses symbols of masculinity and power to examine my upbringing in the Deep South, as well as the relationship between labor and the men in my family. Born into a lineage of truck drivers, carpenters, and farmers, I think about where I see myself in that history, as both an artist and the last carrier of the family name.

Christine Sun Kim featured in UPROXX

Thu. May 5, 2016


Woman sits by fountain

Christine Sun Kim discusses some of her sound projects with UPROXX.

Bruce M. Shackelford releases book, The Wests of Texas: Cattle Ranching Entrepreneurs

Sun. May 1, 2016

cover of book with longhorn photo

The Texas State Historical Association released Bruce M. Shackelford's (B.F.A. in Studio Art, 1975) latest book The Wests of Texas- Cattle Ranching Entrepreneurs in May. He will start his 21st season with PBS Antiques Roadshow in June.

Haley Parsa, undergraduate in Studio Art, receives UT System Regents' Outstanding Student Award in Arts and Humanities

Sat. April 30, 2016

Haley Parsa, undergraduate in Studio Art, received the 2016 Regents' Outstanding Student Award in Arts and Humanities. Only two students will be awarded across The University of Texas System. Both students will be recognized in May at the U.T. System Board of Regents' meeting.

Parsa’s work covers a large variety of mediums, gliding smoothly between them, never committing entirely to one or the other. The ways in which images or objects are embedded in and experienced within time, histories, bodies and space through repetition and documentation is a point of investigation within Parsa’s work. Repetition negates the passage of time yet each mark, unit, form, is documentation of a repeated action.

As an Iranian-American, her Persian history and her connection with it are placed under an intimate and meditative lens. Parsa challenges the expectation to identify with one culture wholly yet entertain both sides and works to situate herself somewhere in between the two. By embracing the liminality of not belonging to one side or another, Parsa is interested in how things can engage with histories and with space to transform, to become more mysterious and impactful.

Farsi letters written in black in on white paper
You Are My Liver, 2016, lithograph, 25 x 18 inches.

This originated from a reoccurring childhood memory of my grandmother that is carried out to this day. As she only speaks Farsi, almost everything she's ever said has had to be translated to me. She would always say "you are my liver," meaning "you are my life/I cannot live without you." Not only was this phrase funny to me but it was always funny to think I feel completely connected to her even though we've never "spoken" - that I can still be in touch with my family, roots, heritage on a very intimate level despite not knowing Farsi or being "fully" Persian or being Persian "enough." I have struggled to situate and understand my place in my family and myself as an Iranian-American woman.

Aesthetically, the piece employs the same repeated letter technique used when learning a language on a fundamental, elementary level. Each letter of the Farsi alphabet is contained in an organic shape similar to bodily, liver-like parts all composing one unit.

black and white print of abstract shapes
Chromatophores at Your Local Grocery, 2015, hand reduction screenprint, 22 x 15 inches.

I drew inspiration from an unlikely source: the grocery store. I took what appeared to be mangled meat or fish and distorted the image into a more abstract representation while staying true to the present values. It was important to treat each indistinguishable form with the same attention and grace. Each is rendered in a very precise and meticulous way in hand reduction (totaling 7 layers) to make accentuate the 3-Dimensionality of this seemingly grotesque abstracted image that would not normally be warranted this much attention or found as striking and curious.